writers

Open Mic Night for Writers & Poets at Latte Da

Latte Da Coffee House and Wine Bar is setting the stage for local writers and poets to share their stories aloud during an Open Mic Night created especially for poetry and short stories. All ages are welcome to attend, and anyone—published, self-published, and as-yet-unpublished writers! Kids, too!—is welcome to sign up starting at 5:30 p.m. The mic will be open from 6 to 8 p.m.

The Open Mic Night is free and there’s no need to eat dinner elsewhere because Latte Da offers a full food menu, along with small plates and delicious drinks from wine to beer to expertly brewed coffee to tea and Italian soda. Latte Da Coffee House & Wine Bar is located at 205 E. 39th Street, just off north Main Street in the Lincoln neighborhood of downtown Vancouver. To learn more, visit lattedacoffeehouse.com.

Open Mic Night for Writers & Poets

Latte Da Coffee House and Wine Bar is setting the stage for local writers and poets to share their stories aloud during an Open Mic Night created especially for poetry and short stories. All ages are welcome to attend, and anyone—published, self-published, and as-yet-unpublished writers! Kids, too!—is welcome to sign up starting at 5:30 p.m. The mic will be open from 6 to 8 p.m.

The Open Mic Night is free and there’s no need to eat dinner elsewhere because Latte Da offers a full food menu, along with small plates and delicious drinks from wine to beer to expertly brewed coffee to tea and Italian soda. Latte Da Coffee House & Wine Bar is located at 205 E. 39th Street, just off north Main Street in the Lincoln neighborhood of downtown Vancouver. To learn more, visit lattedacoffeehouse.com.

The Write Stuff for Local History

The Clark County Historical Museum is looking for writers who love local history to contribute to the CCHM’s 2015 Annual, which will be published later this year. CCHM needs articles about locally famous (or infamous) personalities, businesses, agriculture, exploration, transportation, buildings, churches, local societies, the local impact of historical movements, and simple reminiscences of times past in Clark County.

Recent stories include “Memories of a Yankee Soldier” about Lewis Sutton’s wartime correspondence and diary, which were found in a tattered old satchel. Other recent stories include a history of Mill Plain Boulevard, cable cars, Vancouver’s Derby Hill, radical politics in Camas, and the archeology found under the Columbian’s parking lot.

The museum annual has served as a historical record for Clark County and Southwest Washington history since 1960. The perfect-bound publication runs 100 plus pages, including photos and illustrations and appears in December each year and is distributed free to members. Copies of past issues are available at the museum. Although written by volunteers for a general audience, it’s also used as a reference for students, scholars, regional and public historians, and museum members.

Every issue contains well-researched and documented articles, primary documents, essays, reminiscences, diary excerpts, oral history about Clark County and Southwest Washington, as well as reviews or commentary relating to the Clark County Historical Museum collections or exhibits. For more information and to obtain writers’ guidelines, contact editor Martin Middlewood at freelance47@comcast.net.