Willamette Radio Workshop

Laugh Your Dial Off: Acts from the Golden Age of Radio

Come to the Kiggins Theatre at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 27, for the Willamette Radio Workshop‘s performance of Laugh Your Dial Off, a collection of the best comedy shows and acts from the Golden Age of radio. The show, staged with voice actors and live foley artists, will feature performances made famous by Jack Benny, Fred Allen and Allen’s Alley, Fibber McGee and Molly, Abbot and Costello, Charlie McCarthy and Edgar Bergen with W.C. Fields. Previously unreleased Vic and Sade episodes will be heard here for the first time—plus commercials of the day.

Radio was the perfect medium to bring the tradition of Vaudeville to the average American home. The quick-talking word play and snappy comebacks merged with the quiet family situational comedies. The fresh open takes on the same family frustrations and foibles we face today make the works of these comic geniuses as funny today as they where in the Golden Age.

There will be one performance only at the Kiggins. Admission is a suggested donation of $5 for adults or $3 for children under 12 years old, and proceeds will go to support future shows. The Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so that you can purchase concessions—including wine or beer—and to make yourself comfortable in the beautifully restored 1930s-era theater with comfy leather seats and plenty of drink-holders.

This show is part of the Re-Imagined Radio project produced by John Barber, faculty member in with WSU’s Creative Media & Digital Culture Program. Re-Imagined Radio is a project of Radio Nouspace and is focused on the re-creation of legendary radio dramas in front of live audiences.

Laugh Your Dial Off

Come to the Kiggins Theatre at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 27, for the Willamette Radio Workshop‘s performance of Laugh Your Dial Off, a collection of the best comedy shows and acts from the Golden Age of radio. The show, staged with voice actors and live foley artists, will feature performances made famous by Jack Benny, Fred Allen and Allen’s Alley, Fibber McGee and Molly, Abbot and Costello, Charlie McCarthy and Edgar Bergen with W.C. Fields. Previously unreleased Vic and Sade episodes will be heard here for the first time—plus commercials of the day.

Radio was the perfect medium to bring the tradition of Vaudeville to the average American home. The quick-talking word play and snappy comebacks merged with the quiet family situational comedies. The fresh open takes on the same family frustrations and foibles we face today make the works of these comic geniuses as funny today as they where in the Golden Age.

There will be one performance only at the Kiggins. Admission is a suggested donation of $5 for adults or $3 for children under 12 years old, and proceeds will go to support future shows. The Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so that you can purchase concessions—including wine or beer—and to make yourself comfortable in the beautifully restored 1930s-era theater with comfy leather seats and plenty of drink-holders.

This show is part of the Re-Imagined Radio project produced by John Barber, faculty member in with WSU’s Creative Media & Digital Culture Program. Re-Imagined Radio is a project of Radio Nouspace and is focused on the re-creation of legendary radio dramas in front of live audiences.

Reimagined Radio at the Kiggins: City of Weird

Could your life use an extra dose of weirdness? Come to the Kiggins Theatre at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 26, for the Willamette Radio Workshop‘s staged presentation of the locally bestselling book, “City of Weird,” a collection of 30 original stories set in Portland. Live voice actors and Foley sound effect artists will reinterpret some of the book’s 30 original stories, tales that “blend imagination, literary writing, and pop culture into a cohesive weirdness that honors the city’s personality, its bookstores and bridges and solo volcano, as well as the tradition of sci-fi pulp magazines,” according to the Powell’s Books review. Garnished with digital SFX, music, and visual backdrops, it promises to be a strangely memorable evening.

There will be one performance only at the Kiggins. Admission is $5 for adults or $3 for children under 12 years old. The Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so that you can purchase concessions—including wine or beer—and to make yourself comfortable in the beautifully restored 1930s-era theater with comfy leather seats and plenty of drink-holders.

This show is in partnership with WSU’s Creative Media & Digital Culture Program. “Reimagined Radio” is a project of Radio Nouspace and is focused on the re-creation of legendary radio dramas in front of live audiences. To learn more about this particular production, check out Scott Hewitt’s excellent article in The Columbian.

Reimagined Radio at the Kiggins: City of Weird

City-of-Weird-Front-Cover-web-sizeCould your life use an extra dose of weirdness? Come to the Kiggins Theatre at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 26, for the Willamette Radio Workshop‘s staged presentation of the locally bestselling book, “City of Weird,” a collection of 30 original stories set in Portland. Live voice actors and Foley sound effect artists will reinterpret some of the book’s 30 original stories, tales that “blend imagination, literary writing, and pop culture into a cohesive weirdness that honors the city’s personality, its bookstores and bridges and solo volcano, as well as the tradition of sci-fi pulp magazines,” according to the Powell’s Books review. Garnished with digital SFX, music, and visual backdrops, it promises to be a strangely memorable evening.

There will be one performance only at the Kiggins. Admission is $5 for adults or $3 for children under 12 years old. The Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so that you can purchase concessions—including wine or beer—and to make yourself comfortable in the beautifully restored 1930s-era theater with comfy leather seats and plenty of drink-holders.

This show is in partnership with WSU’s Creative Media & Digital Culture Program. “Reimagined Radio” is a project of Radio Nouspace and is focused on the re-creation of legendary radio dramas in front of live audiences. To learn more about this particular production, check out Scott Hewitt’s excellent article in The Columbian.

Free Performance of A Radio Christmas Carol

The Willamette Radio Workshop will perform A Radio Christmas Carol at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 21, at the Kiggins Theatre. The Willamette Radio Workshop recreates live radio dramas from the Golden Age of radio, using only voice actors and Foley sound effects.

A Radio Christmas Carol is a live, 1940s-style radio performance of Charles Dickens’ immensely and immediately popular novel, A Christmas Carol, first published December 1843. This radio play is adapted from the Campbell Playhouse radio dramatization narrated by Orson Welles and starring Lionel Barrymore as Ebenezer Scrooge. The old miser Scrooge, cold of heart and spirit, is transformed by visits from the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future into a kind, generous, and compassionate man.

The Kiggins Theatre—located at 1011 Main St. in downtown Vancouver—will open its doors open at 6 p.m. so that families can enjoy the seasonal sounds of the Hough School Glee Singers and the Holly Jolly Singers, who will lead the audience in a selection of favorite Christmas carols. The evening is free with a donation of a non-perishable food item for the Clark County Food Bank. Or, if you like, you can donate $5 to help fund future performances.

A Radio Christmas Carol

The Willamette Radio Workshop will perform A Radio Christmas Carol at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 21, at the Kiggins Theatre. The Willamette Radio Workshop recreates live radio dramas from the Golden Age of radio, using only voice actors and Foley sound effects.

A Radio Christmas Carol is a live, 1940s-style radio performance of Charles Dickens’ immensely and immediately popular novel, A Christmas Carol, first published December 1843. This radio play is adapted from the Campbell Playhouse radio dramatization narrated by Orson Welles and starring Lionel Barrymore as Ebenezer Scrooge. The old miser Scrooge, cold of heart and spirit, is transformed by visits from the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future into a kind, generous, and compassionate man.

The Kiggins Theatre—located at 1011 Main St. in downtown Vancouver—will open its doors open at 6 p.m. so that families can enjoy the seasonal sounds of the Hough School Glee Singers and the Holly Jolly Singers, who will lead the audience in a selection of favorite Christmas carols. The evening is free with a donation of a non-perishable food item for the Clark County Food Bank. Or, if you like, you can donate $5 to help fund future performances.

 

Dracula Radio Play at the Kiggins Theatre

Ready for a bit of good, old-fashioned Halloween scariness? Come to the special performance of the radio play “Dracula” at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 27, at the Kiggins Theatre. The Willamette Radio Workshop will recreate it for you on stage with live voice actors and Foley sound-effect artists. Admission is $5 for adults or $3 for children under 12 years old. The Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. to purchase concessions—including wine or beer—and to make yourself comfortable in the beautifully restored 1930s-era theater with comfy leather seats and plenty of drink-holders.

Dracula, the 1897 novel by Bram Stoker, is considered one of the greatest horror novels ever written. Stoker drew inspiration for his novel from tales of Vlad the Impaler, born 1431 into a noble Transylvania family. Vlad impaled his enemies on tall stakes. He was reported to have dined among his victims, and to have eaten bread dipped in their blood. In 1931, archaeologists exhumed his grave and took the skeleton to the History Museum in Bucharest, where it mysteriously disappeared.

In 1938, the Mercury Theatre broadcast Dracula as a radio drama directed by and starring Orson Welles as Count Dracula. This original broadcast of Dracula is the basis for the Re-Imagined Radio performance on Oct. 27. This show is in partnership with WSU’s Creative Media & Digital Culture Program. “Reimagined Radio” is a project of Radio Nouspace and is focused on the re-creation of legendary radio dramas in front of live audiences.

Dracula at the Kiggins

Ready for a bit of good, old-fashioned Halloween scariness? Come to the special performance of the radio play “Dracula” at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 27, at the Kiggins Theatre. The Willamette Radio Workshop will recreate it for you on stage with live voice actors and Foley sound-effect artists. Admission is $5 for adults or $3 for children under 12 years old. The Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. to purchase concessions—including wine or beer—and to make yourself comfortable in the beautifully restored 1930s-era theater with comfy leather seats and plenty of drink-holders.

Dracula, the 1897 novel by Bram Stoker, is considered one of the greatest horror novels ever written. Stoker drew inspiration for his novel from tales of Vlad the Impaler, born 1431 into a noble Transylvania family. Vlad impaled his enemies on tall stakes. He was reported to have dined among his victims, and to have eaten bread dipped in their blood. In 1931, archaeologists exhumed his grave and took the skeleton to the History Museum in Bucharest, where it mysteriously disappeared.

In 1938, the Mercury Theatre broadcast Dracula as a radio drama directed by and starring Orson Welles as Count Dracula. This original broadcast of Dracula is the basis for the Re-Imagined Radio performance on Oct. 27. This show is in partnership with WSU’s Creative Media & Digital Culture Program. “Reimagined Radio” is a project of Radio Nouspace and is focused on the re-creation of legendary radio dramas in front of live audiences.

Above image: Bela Lugosi as Dracula in the 1931 film adaptation.

Radio Plays at the Kiggins: Gunsmoke & The Shadow

Broadcast for 480 episodes from 1952 to 1961, Gunsmoke is one of the longest running radio series ever—and perhaps radio’s last great drama. In each episode, Marshal Matt Dillon deals with human dilemmas in Dodge City in Kansas Territory in the late 1800s. Sometimes he finds a solution, sometimes he doesn’t. There’s nothing romantic about his job, and Western fiction stereotypes are overturned with mature depictions of hard realities on America’s western frontier. Criminals are not always caught. Episodes often end unhappily. Women and minorities are mistreated. But Gunsmoke explored such issues, and brought them to our attentions well ahead of other media.

At 7 p.m. on Wednesday, May 4, Willamette Radio Workshop will recreate an episode of Gunsmoke live on the Kiggins Theatre stage with voice actors and Foley artists, enhanced with digital sound effects, music, and visual backdrops. The result is “Re-Imagined Radio,” a partnership between Willamette Radio Workshop and WSU’s Creative Media and Digital Culture program—and all performances are absolutely free.

But wait, there’s more…after Gunsmoke, audience members will be treated to another classic from the Golden Era of Radio, The Shadow—a.k.a. Lamont Cranston, a young man with a mysterious power to “cloud men’s minds” who uses this power to thwart criminal activities. Beyond radio drama, pulp magazine series, and novels, The Shadow became one of the most famous action heroes of the 20th century, inspiring comic strips, comic books, television shows, video games, motion pictures, and other radio dramas. At the end of each episode, the narrator asks, “Who know what evil lurks in the hearts of men? …the Shadow knows!”

 

Radio Plays at the Kiggins: Gunsmoke & The Shadow

Broadcast for 480 episodes from 1952 to 1961, Gunsmoke is one of the longest running radio series ever—and perhaps radio’s last great drama. In each episode, Marshal Matt Dillon deals with human dilemmas in Dodge City in Kansas Territory in the late 1800s. Sometimes he finds a solution, sometimes he doesn’t. There’s nothing romantic about his job, and Western fiction stereotypes are overturned with mature depictions of hard realities on America’s western frontier. Criminals are not always caught. Episodes often end unhappily. Women and minorities are mistreated. But Gunsmoke explored such issues, and brought them to our attentions well ahead of other media.

At 7 p.m. on Wednesday, May 4, Willamette Radio Workshop will recreate an episode of Gunsmoke live on the Kiggins Theatre stage with voice actors and Foley artists, enhanced with digital sound effects, music, and visual backdrops. The result is “Re-Imagined Radio,” a partnership between Willamette Radio Workshop and WSU’s Creative Media and Digital Culture program—and all performances are absolutely free.

But wait, there’s more…after Gunsmoke, audience members will be treated to another classic from the Golden Era of Radio, The Shadow—a.k.a. Lamont Cranston, a young man with a mysterious power to “cloud men’s minds” who uses this power to thwart criminal activities. Beyond radio drama, pulp magazine series, and novels, The Shadow became one of the most famous action heroes of the 20th century, inspiring comic strips, comic books, television shows, video games, motion pictures, and other radio dramas. At the end of each episode, the narrator asks, “Who know what evil lurks in the hearts of men? …the Shadow knows!”

Willamette Radio Workshop: “The Case Files of Dr. Moreau”

The Willamette Radio Workshop will present a live radio adaptation of William S. Gregory’s “The Case Files of Dr. Moreau” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 22, at the Kiggins Theatre. The event is free and open to the public. The performance is a collaboration between the Willamette Radio Workshop, Washington State University Vancouver’s Creative Media and Digital Culture program, and the Kiggins Theatre. John Barber, faculty member with the program, teaches a course on digital storytelling and is staging the performance as part of his Re-imagined Radio project.

“The Case Files of Dr. Moreau” is Gregory’s adaptation of H.G. Wells’s “The Island of Dr. Moreau.” The novel focuses on a scientist’s attempts to convert animals into humans using vivisection, and its themes include pain and cruelty, moral responsibility, human identity and human interference with nature. The radio adaptation examines these themes from the perspective of the “manimals”—the creatures of Moreau’s experiments as they suffer under the experiments of Moreau.

This will be a recreation of the original radio drama complete with voice actors and Foley sound artists, along with digital and multimedia components. Doors open at 6 p.m. Concessions, beer and wine will be available for purchase in the lobby and in the swanky Marquee Lounge upstairs. The Kiggins Theatre is located at 1011 Main St. in downtown Vancouver.

The Case Files of Dr. Moreau

The Willamette Radio Workshop will present a live radio adaptation of William S. Gregory’s “The Case Files of Dr. Moreau” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 22, at the Kiggins Theatre. The event is free and open to the public. The performance is a collaboration between the Willamette Radio Workshop, Washington State University Vancouver’s Creative Media and Digital Culture program, and the Kiggins Theatre. John Barber, faculty member with the program, teaches a course on digital storytelling and is staging the performance as part of his Re-imagined Radio project.

“The Case Files of Dr. Moreau” is Gregory’s adaptation of H.G. Wells’s “The Island of Dr. Moreau.” The novel focuses on a scientist’s attempts to convert animals into humans using vivisection, and its themes include pain and cruelty, moral responsibility, human identity and human interference with nature. The radio adaptation examines these themes from the perspective of the “manimals”—the creatures of Moreau’s experiments as they suffer under the experiments of Moreau.

This will be a recreation of the original radio drama complete with voice actors and Foley sound artists, along with digital and multimedia components. Doors open at 6 p.m. Concessions, beer and wine will be available for purchase in the lobby and in the swanky Marquee Lounge upstairs. The Kiggins Theatre is located at 1011 Main St. in downtown Vancouver.

 

Around the World in 80 Days

AroundWorld80DaysThe Willamette Radio Workshop is heating up its hot air balloon and is ready to take you around the world as part of “Chronicles: Stories of the Past, Present & Future,” an exhibit by students in the creative media and digital culture program at WSU Vancouver. Students and actors will perform a live reenactment of the original radio broadcast of “Around the World in 80 Days” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 6, at the Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver. The ensemble will use only voice actors and Foley sound effects. The performance is entirely free, children of moderate attention spans are welcome, and doors open at 6 p.m.

“Around the World in 80 Days,” based on the eponymous novel by Jules Verne, was first broadcast Oct. 23, 1938, by Orson Welles and the Mercury Theater. A comedy set in 1873, the story begins with a simple wager and tells of the story of Phileas Fogg and Passepartout as they journey around the world. The broadcast was immensely popular was later adapted for the 1956 film starring David Niven.

The “Chronicles: Stories of the Past, Present & Future” exhibit explores transmedial storytelling and will celebrate its opening immediately following the reenactment. The exhibit can be viewed on Fridays and Saturdays from noon to 4:30 p.m. through the month of August at the Nouspace Gallery & Media Lounge, located in the North Bank Artists Gallery.