Total Solar Eclipse

Watch the Eclipse at Fort Vancouver

On Monday, Aug. 21, a solar eclipse will cross the continental United States for the first time in 38 years. National parks across the country are planning special eclipse-viewing events, including Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. You can come to the fort to view the eclipse safely—and for free!

Though the park is usually closed on Mondays, the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Visitors are welcome to view the eclipse from the vantage point of the park’s Parade Ground or Great Meadow. Throughout the event, national park rangers will be roving the park grounds to answer questions. The eclipse will begin at 9:06 a.m. and will end at 11:38 a.m. The Couve isn’t in the path of totality, but it is very close! Visitors to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site on the day of the eclipse will see the moon cover 99% of our view of the sun. The period of 99% totality will occur at 10:19 a.m.

From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Friends of Fort Vancouver bookstore at the Visitor Center will also be open. Eclipse viewing glasses, which allow their wearers to look at the eclipse safely, will be for sale. At the bookstore, artist Lillian Pitt will launch her exclusive new line of “Eclipse Over Warm Springs” jewelry and masks. At 11:30 a.m., as the eclipse ends, Confluence Project Historian Mary Rose will present “Plunge into Darkness: Historical Eclipses that Crossed the Pacific Northwest,” a special lecture on the history of eclipses in our region. This talk will also take place at the Visitor Center.

The Fort Vancouver Visitor Center  is located at 1501 E Evergreen Blvd. in Vancouver and free parking is available in the adjacent lot—although additional parking may be provided at other locations for this event. Other park facilities (including the reconstructed fort and Pearson Air Museum) will remain closed.

Note to eclipse viewers: It’s never safe to look at the sun except for the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality. The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters such as “eclipse glasses” or handheld solar viewers that meet the ISO 12312-2 international standards for such products. Learn more about viewing the eclipse safely at https://www.nps.gov/articles/eclipsesafety.htm.

Watch the Eclipse at Fort Vancouver

On Monday, Aug. 21, a solar eclipse will cross the continental United States for the first time in 38 years. National parks across the country are planning special eclipse-viewing events, including Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. You can come to the fort to view the eclipse safely—and for free!

Though the park is usually closed on Mondays, the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Visitors are welcome to view the eclipse from the vantage point of the park’s Parade Ground or Great Meadow. Throughout the event, national park rangers will be roving the park grounds to answer questions. The eclipse will begin at 9:06 a.m. and will end at 11:38 a.m. The Couve isn’t in the path of totality, but it is very close! Visitors to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site on the day of the eclipse will see the moon cover 99% of our view of the sun. The period of 99% totality will occur at 10:19 a.m.

From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Friends of Fort Vancouver bookstore at the Visitor Center will also be open. Eclipse viewing glasses, which allow their wearers to look at the eclipse safely, will be for sale. At the bookstore, artist Lillian Pitt will launch her exclusive new line of “Eclipse Over Warm Springs” jewelry and masks. At 11:30 a.m., as the eclipse ends, Confluence Project Historian Mary Rose will present “Plunge into Darkness: Historical Eclipses that Crossed the Pacific Northwest,” a special lecture on the history of eclipses in our region. This talk will also take place at the Visitor Center.

The Fort Vancouver Visitor Center  is located at 1501 E Evergreen Blvd. in Vancouver and free parking is available in the adjacent lot—although additional parking may be provided at other locations for this event. Other park facilities (including the reconstructed fort and Pearson Air Museum) will remain closed.

Note to eclipse viewers: It’s never safe to look at the sun except for the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality. The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters such as “eclipse glasses” or handheld solar viewers that meet the ISO 12312-2 international standards for such products. Learn more about viewing the eclipse safely at https://www.nps.gov/articles/eclipsesafety.htm.

Science on Tap: ECLIPSE-O-MANIA!

The Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap —”The Sights, Safety, and Science of the Great American Eclipse”—at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 9, will answer every question you ever had about the upcoming total solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21. On this day, the continental United States will experience its first total eclipse since 1979, and its first coast-to-coast eclipse since 1918. With over 12 million people in the path of totality and nearly 200 million within a single day’s drive, this may become the most watched eclipse in world history. From what you can expect to see to how to stay safe to the current and historical science that eclipses have brought us, this talk should give you all the information you need for an unforgettable eclipse experience!

The speaker, Dr. Ethan Siegel, was born in New York, majored in three different things as an undergrad, and got his Ph.D. in theoretical physics. (See? It never hurts to be a little indecisive.) After postdoctoral research focusing on dark matter and cosmic structure formation, he became a physics professor and a professional science communicator. The communication was more fun, so now he writes and speaks full time, including for Forbes, and NASA. His blog, Starts With a Bang, was voted the internet’s top science blog by the Institute of Physics and also by Real Clear Science. His first book, Beyond the Galaxy, is available today (and yes, he has copies to sign), and his second, Treknology, about the real-life science behind the technologies envisioned by Star Trek, comes out in October.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online, or check with the Kiggins’ box office) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event. (…and reserving a seat is recommended, since this topic will not doubt be popular.)

Science on Tap: Eclipse-o-Mania!

The Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap —”The Sights, Safety, and Science of the Great American Eclipse”—at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 9, will answer every question you ever had about the upcoming total solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21. On this day, the continental United States will experience its first total eclipse since 1979, and its first coast-to-coast eclipse since 1918. With over 12 million people in the path of totality and nearly 200 million within a single day’s drive, this may become the most watched eclipse in world history. From what you can expect to see to how to stay safe to the current and historical science that eclipses have brought us, this talk should give you all the information you need for an unforgettable eclipse experience!

The speaker, Dr. Ethan Siegel, was born in New York, majored in three different things as an undergrad, and got his Ph.D. in theoretical physics. (See? It never hurts to be a little indecisive.) After postdoctoral research focusing on dark matter and cosmic structure formation, he became a physics professor and a professional science communicator. The communication was more fun, so now he writes and speaks full time, including for Forbes, and NASA. His blog, Starts With a Bang, was voted the internet’s top science blog by the Institute of Physics and also by Real Clear Science. His first book, Beyond the Galaxy, is available today (and yes, he has copies to sign), and his second, Treknology, about the real-life science behind the technologies envisioned by Star Trek, comes out in October.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online, or check with the Kiggins’ box office) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event. (…and reserving a seat is recommended, since this topic will not doubt be popular.)