Slow Food Southwest Washington

Slow Food Southwest Washington “Taste Renaissance” Dinner at Warehouse ’23

Slow Food Southwest Washington is hosting its annual dinner and auction at Warehouse ’23 from 5 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 18. Bring your taste buds and your curiosity about local food networks and savor a multi-course meal prepared from Clark County’s abundant farms and world-class chefs. Learn more about the local Slow Food chapter and meet others who love local food and the growers who tend the soil so that it can keep producing delicious, healthy food. The menu reads like a tantalizing paean to food:

  • Raw oysters with preserved cranberries and watercress salsa verde
  • Duck confit with pickled chanterelles  and cold smoked duck breast with savory huckleberry jam served on brown butter-butternut squash crackers
  • Rabbit and mushroom sausage, sunchoke purée. and huckleberry whole grain mustard reduction
  • Chickory and arugula salad topped with candied squash, beets, hazelnuts, goat cheese and kombucha vinaigrette
  • Roasted carrots and delicata squash with smoky romesco
  • Collard greens and beets with roasted leek dressing
  • Beef with chanterelle confit, huckleberry wine sauce and goat cheese, served with turnip gratin
  • Morel mushroom Marsala over roasted chicken, served with cranberry chestnut polenta
  • Walnut and bean paté served with farmhouse caponata with pickled apple, sweet pepper, and green tomato
  • Honey polenta cake with orchard fruits, cranberry and mascarpone
  • Selection of cheeses from Walapa Hills Creamery

All the food has been grown, produced and harvested by Southwest Washington farmers, and prepared by chefs from places as varied as Skamania Lodge, the Clark College Culinary Program, Gather and Feast Farm, Simply Thyme, Rally Pizza, Bleu Door Bakery, and Warehouse ’23. There will be a wine bar featuring local produced fine wines, with beer and cider also available for purchase. The evening’s guest speaker is from Southwest Washington’s leading cheesemaker, Wallapa Hills Creamery. For more information, including a complete list of chefs and farms, visit http://mailchi.mp/ddec2acfe14f/volunteer-wire-1900813. General admission tickets are $95 per person, VIP tickets are $160 and include wine and a pre-event culinary presentation with Champagne, couples are $190, and tables seating 10 are available for $950. For more information or to buy tickets online now, click here.

Attendees will also have a chance to find out more about Clark County Grown, a local organization that is creating a culture of eating locally through marketing and education; Plate to Planet, which works with Clark County youth to explore food heritage, the local food system, food justice, and healthy eating; and Urban Abundance, which rescues fresh, local produce that would otherwise go to waste and gives it to people in need. To learn more about Slow Food Southwest Washington, visit www.slowfoodswwa.com, follow them on Instagram or Twitter, or get regular updates about Slow Food activities and meetings on the Slow Food Southwest Washington Facebook page.

“Taste Renaissance” Slow Food Dinner & Auction

Slow Food Southwest Washington is hosting its annual dinner and auction at Warehouse ’23 from 5 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 18. Bring your taste buds and your curiosity about local food networks and savor a multi-course meal prepared from Clark County’s abundant farms and world-class chefs. Learn more about the local Slow Food chapter and meet others who love local food and the growers who tend the soil so that it can keep producing delicious, healthy food. The menu reads like a tantalizing paean to food:

  • Raw oysters with preserved cranberries and watercress salsa verde
  • Duck confit with pickled chanterelles  and cold smoked duck breast with savory huckleberry jam served on brown butter-butternut squash crackers
  • Rabbit and mushroom sausage, sunchoke purée. and huckleberry whole grain mustard reduction
  • Chickory and arugula salad topped with candied squash, beets, hazelnuts, goat cheese and kombucha vinaigrette
  • Roasted carrots and delicata squash with smoky romesco
  • Collard greens and beets with roasted leek dressing
  • Beef with chanterelle confit, huckleberry wine sauce and goat cheese, served with turnip gratin
  • Morel mushroom Marsala over roasted chicken, served with cranberry chestnut polenta
  • Walnut and bean paté served with farmhouse caponata with pickled apple, sweet pepper, and green tomato
  • Honey polenta cake with orchard fruits, cranberry and mascarpone
  • Selection of cheeses from Walapa Hills Creamery

All the food has been grown, produced and harvested by Southwest Washington farmers, and prepared by chefs from places as varied as Skamania Lodge, the Clark College Culinary Program, Gather and Feast Farm, Simply Thyme, Rally Pizza, Bleu Door Bakery, and Warehouse ’23. There will be a wine bar featuring local produced fine wines, with beer and cider also available for purchase. The evening’s guest speaker is from Southwest Washington’s leading cheesemaker, Wallapa Hills Creamery. For more information, including a complete list of chefs and farms, visit http://mailchi.mp/ddec2acfe14f/volunteer-wire-1900813. General admission tickets are $95 per person, VIP tickets are $160 and include wine and a pre-event culinary presentation with Champagne, couples are $190, and tables seating 10 are available for $950. For more information or to buy tickets online now, click here.

Attendees will also have a chance to find out more about Clark County Grown, a local organization that is creating a culture of eating locally through marketing and education; Plate to Planet, which works with Clark County youth to explore food heritage, the local food system, food justice, and healthy eating; and Urban Abundance, which rescues fresh, local produce that would otherwise go to waste and gives it to people in need. To learn more about Slow Food Southwest Washington, visit www.slowfoodswwa.com, follow them on Instagram or Twitter, or get regular updates about Slow Food activities and meetings on the Slow Food Southwest Washington Facebook page.

Old Apple Tree Festival & Cider Tasting

The Old Apple Tree Festival is adding a hard cider tent this year at the celebration of this 191-year-old apple tree! Join the celebration, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 7, at the Old Apple Tree Park, 112 S.E. Columbia Way, directly east of the I-5 Bridge and south of Hwy. 14, within the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

Throughout the day at this free, family-friendly event, enjoy live music, tours of the Land Bridge, art and crafts for kids, tree care workshops, and food available for purchase.  The Urban Forestry Commission will give away a limited number of tree cuttings from the Old Apple Tree. Bring your own clean apples and containers to participate in the free apple pressing, a popular feature of the community festival.

New this year is a 21-and-over, hard cider garden, hosted by Slow Food Southwest Washington. The cider garden features are Tooley Bender from Battle Ground, English Estates from Vancouver, Jester & Judge from Stevenson, and Moulton Falls from Yacolt. Hard ciders will be available to sample or drink by the glass, for a small fee. Limited edition Old Apple Tree Festival 32-ounce growlers will also be available to purchase and take home. Visit www.slowfoodswwa.com for more information.

Planted in 1826 at Fort Vancouver, Vancouver’s venerable Old Apple Tree is the oldest apple tree in the Northwest and considered the matriarch of Washington State’s apple industry. Despite floods, winds, drought, ice and snow, the tree has survived and continues to produce some fruit. The Old Apple Tree Festival is presented by the Urban Forestry Commission, Bartlett Tree Care, Slow Food Southwest Washington, and the National Park Service at Fort Vancouver. For more information about the Old Apple Tree Festival and Vancouver’s efforts to enhance the community’s beautiful and beneficial trees, call Urban Forestry at 360-487-8308 or visit www.cityofvancouver.us/urbanforestry.

Slow Food SW WA Social

Slow Food Southwest Washington hosts a monthly social on the first Wednesday of every month—this month, that’s Wednesday, June 7. Bring your taste buds and your curiosity about local food networks and come to Brothers Cascadia Brewing, located at 9811 N.E. 15th Ave. in Vancouver, from 5 to 9 p.m. Learn more about the local Slow Food chapter and meet others who love local food and the growers who tend the soil so that it can keep producing delicious, healthy food.

Enjoy pizza from the Pizzeria La Sorrentina food cart and beer on tap from Brothers Cascadia on tap. Pizzeria La Sorrentina will donate a portion of the evening’s proceeds to Slow Food Southwest Washington and Brothers Cascadia will also donate $1 per each pint of beer sold. At 6 p.m., attendees will hear a special presentation by Denise Smee from Clark Conservation District, a nonprofit organization with the goal of protecting, conserving, and improving the local area’s natural resources through water quality support, soil management, and maintaining critical habitat areas. There will also be a 50/50 cash raffle with a drawing at 8 p.m., which you don’t need to be present to win.

Attendees will also have a chance to find out more about Clark County Grown, a local organization that is creating a culture of eating locally through marketing and education; Plate to Planet, which works with Clark County youth to explore food heritage, the local food system, food justice, and healthy eating; and Urban Abundance, which rescues fresh, local produce that would otherwise go to waste and gives it to people in need.

To learn more about Slow Food Southwest Washington, visit www.slowfoodswwa.com, follow them on Instagram or Twitter, or get regular updates about Slow Food activities and meetings on the Slow Food Southwest Washington Facebook page.

Slow Food Social

Slow Food Southwest Washington hosts a monthly social on the first Wednesday of every month—this month, that’s Wednesday, June 7. Bring your taste buds and your curiosity about local food networks and come to Brothers Cascadia Brewing, located at 9811 N.E. 15th Ave. in Vancouver, from 5 to 9 p.m. Learn more about the local Slow Food chapter and meet others who love local food and the growers who tend the soil so that it can keep producing delicious, healthy food.

Enjoy pizza from the Pizzeria La Sorrentina food cart and beer on tap from Brothers Cascadia on tap. Pizzeria La Sorrentina will donate a portion of the evening’s proceeds to Slow Food Southwest Washington and Brothers Cascadia will also donate $1 per each pint of beer sold. At 6 p.m., attendees will hear a special presentation by Denise Smee from Clark Conservation District, a nonprofit organization with the goal of protecting, conserving, and improving the local area’s natural resources through water quality support, soil management, and maintaining critical habitat areas. There will also be a 50/50 cash raffle with a drawing at 8 p.m., which you don’t need to be present to win.

Attendees will also have a chance to find out more about Clark County Grown, a local organization that is creating a culture of eating locally through marketing and education; Plate to Planet, which works with Clark County youth to explore food heritage, the local food system, food justice, and healthy eating; and Urban Abundance, which rescues fresh, local produce that would otherwise go to waste and gives it to people in need.

To learn more about Slow Food Southwest Washington, visit www.slowfoodswwa.com, follow them on Instagram or Twitter, or get regular updates about Slow Food activities and meetings on the Slow Food Southwest Washington Facebook page.

Taste Renaissance Fall Feast at Warehouse ’23

Southwest Washington is immensely fortunate in that our chefs and farmers share close ties, which means that the veggies you eat at Lapellah, OurBar, Rally Pizza, Ben’s Bottle Shop, Nuestra Mesa, Niche Wine Bar, Smokehouse Provisions, Roots, The Grocery, or Willem’s on Main are quite likely to have been grown on land that’s an easy drive from your restaurant table. And of course there’s the organically-fed, humanely raised meat from places like Reister Farms or Botany Bay Farm, plus beer, wine, cider, mead and spirits crafted from local grains, grapes, hops, honey, apples and berries. Ooooh, and don’t forget Southwest Washington’s delectable cheeses…

On Tuesday, Nov. 15, from 5 to 9 p.m., you can taste all the wonders of Southwest Washington’s fertile farms at “Taste Renaissance 2016,” hosted by Slow Food Southwest Washington in partnership with local farmers, chefs, artisan cheesemakers, brewers, vintners, and distillers. You’ll enjoy an autumnal feast, an eco-gastronomic celebration of our region’s foods and spirits. The event is a fundraiser for Slow Food Southwest Washington, and all proceeds will support its efforts to inspire people to eat, grow, and share local healthy food. The goal is to raise $10,000 to fund the nonprofit organization’s plan to harvest 40,000 pounds of fruit for the Clark County Food Bank and to operate a food-focused summer program for at-risk youth in Clark County.

Taste Renaissance will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. at Warehouse ’23, located at 100 Columbia St., in the former Red Lion Inn at the Quay. Starting at 5 p.m., you can purchase local wine, beer and cider from the bar, as well as nibble on hors d’oeuvres and bid on silent auction items. Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m., followed by a cheese course and a presentation by Marci Shuman of Cascadia Creamery at 7:30 p.m. At 8 p.m., the live auction begins. Tickets are $65 per person or $100 for VIPs until Saturday, Oct. 29; after that date, they’re $75 and $120, respectively. To purchase tickets, click here or go to www.slowfoodswwa.com.

Taste Renaissance Fall Feast

Southwest Washington is immensely fortunate in that our chefs and farmers share close ties, which means that the veggies you eat at Lapellah, OurBar, Rally Pizza, Ben’s Bottle Shop, Nuestra Mesa, Niche Wine Bar, Smokehouse Provisions, Roots, The Grocery, or Willem’s on Main are quite likely to have been grown on land that’s an easy drive from your restaurant table. And of course there’s the organically-fed, humanely raised meat from places like Reister Farms or Botany Bay Farm, plus beer, wine, cider, mead and spirits crafted from local grains, grapes, hops, honey, apples and berries. Ooooh, and don’t forget Southwest Washington’s delectable cheeses…

On Tuesday, Nov. 15, from 5 to 9 p.m., you can taste all the wonders of Southwest Washington’s fertile farms at “Taste Renaissance 2016,” hosted by Slow Food Southwest Washington in partnership with local farmers, chefs, artisan cheesemakers, brewers, vintners, and distillers. You’ll enjoy an autumnal feast, an eco-gastronomic celebration of our region’s foods and spirits. The event is a fundraiser for Slow Food Southwest Washington, and all proceeds will support its efforts to inspire people to eat, grow, and share local healthy food. The goal is to raise $10,000 to fund the nonprofit organization’s plan to harvest 40,000 pounds of fruit for the Clark County Food Bank and to operate a food-focused summer program for at-risk youth in Clark County.

Taste Renaissance will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. at Warehouse ’23, located at 100 Columbia St., in the former Red Lion Inn at the Quay. Starting at 5 p.m., you can purchase local wine, beer and cider from the bar, as well as nibble on hors d’oeuvres and bid on silent auction items. Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m., followed by a cheese course and a presentation by Marci Shuman of Cascadia Creamery at 7:30 p.m. At 8 p.m., the live auction begins. Tickets are $65 per person or $100 for VIPs until Saturday, Oct. 29; after that date, they’re $75 and $120, respectively. To purchase tickets, click here or go to www.slowfoodswwa.com.

Native Pollinators Workshop

A whopping 75% of flowering plants and crops are pollinated by animals as they collect nectar. In Southwest Washington, that includes not only bees, but also ants, moths, hoverflies, pollen wasps, beetles, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Garden expert Susan Knilans of Urban Abundance will present information on native pollinators and how to attract them during a free workshop from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 9, at the Foley Community Orchard. Learn about the important work that pollinators do and get tips on how to make your outdoor spaces inviting for native species of bees, butterflies, hummingbirds and other animals that carry pollen from one plant to another.

Workshop attendees will make their own “pollinator hotels” to take home and put in their gardens. After the workshop, plan to stay on and do some volunteer work in the orchard such as pruning, removing invasive species of plants, and spreading mulch. The Foley Orchard is a community treasure: located in the Felida neighborhood, it’s 60 years old and contains about 150 fruit-bearing trees. The free workshop is hosted by Urban Abundance and Slow Food Southwest Washington. For directions to the orchard and to RSVP, email warren@slowfoodswwa.com.