Science on Tap

Science on Tap: Concussions & Football

The Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap is about the growing evidence that playing tackle football—even with helmets—is bad for brains. Come on down to the theater at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 11, for “Should Humans Play Football? The Neuroscience of Concussions.” We humans have always loved dangerous sports, from ancient chariot racing all the way to today’s football, soccer, and hockey. Despite safety equipment, the sight of a player being checked for a head injury has become increasingly common. We now know that multiple concussions and similar injuries to the head can accelerate certain forms of dementia and lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). What does that mean for both professional athletes and for your kids who play on after school sports teams?

Dr. Larry Sherman is a neuroscientist at OHSU, and his lab has been exploring how the brain responds to certain types of injury and will explore the mechanisms underlying the brain’s responses to injury and possible ways to reverse brain damage. Dr. Sherman has spoken at several earlier Science on Tap events, including The Neuroscience of Pleasure and Love, Every Brain Needs Music, and You and Your Racist Brain: The Neuroscience of Prejudice—but at this event, he will be talking about his own research.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $9 in advance (click here to purchase online, or check with the Kiggins’ box office) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event. (…and reserving a seat is recommended, since this topic will not doubt be popular.)

Science on Tap: Football & Concussions

The Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap is about the growing evidence that playing tackle football—even with helmets—is bad for brains. Come on down to the theater at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 11, for “Should Humans Play Football? The Neuroscience of Concussions.” We humans have always loved dangerous sports, from ancient chariot racing all the way to today’s football, soccer, and hockey. Despite safety equipment, the sight of a player being checked for a head injury has become increasingly common. We now know that multiple concussions and similar injuries to the head can accelerate certain forms of dementia and lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). What does that mean for both professional athletes and for your kids who play on after school sports teams?

Dr. Larry Sherman is a neuroscientist at OHSU, and his lab has been exploring how the brain responds to certain types of injury and will explore the mechanisms underlying the brain’s responses to injury and possible ways to reverse brain damage. Dr. Sherman has spoken at several earlier Science on Tap events, including The Neuroscience of Pleasure and Love, Every Brain Needs Music, and You and Your Racist Brain: The Neuroscience of Prejudice—but at this event, he will be talking about his own research.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $9 in advance (click here to purchase online, or check with the Kiggins’ box office) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event.

Science on Tap: Teen Romance & Etc.

The Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap is about—are you ready for this, parents of teens?—”The New Adolescent Sexuality: Life, Lust, and Learning” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 13. 
Chances are pretty good that if you’re an adult, you’ve had a question or two about sex in your life…and if you have young people in your life, they definitely have questions about sex. But some things have changed since you were young, what with social media and sexting and people identifying as having non-binary genders and the like, and it may be confusing and embarrassing to talk to your kids, especially if you don’t have the answers yourself.

At this Science on Tap, Dr. L. Kris Gowen, author of Sexual Decisions: The Ultimate Teen Guide, will talk about what’s new in teen sexuality (for example, did you know that teen pregnancy rates are down?), how to get reliable and trustworthy information about sex, what information is and is not being covered in schools, and how to talk about this subject with the young people in your life.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online, or check with the Kiggins’ box office) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event. (…and reserving a seat is recommended, since this topic will not doubt be popular.)

Science on Tap: Teen Romance

The Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap is about—are you ready for this, parents of teens?—”The New Adolescent Sexuality: Life, Lust, and Learning” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 13. 
Chances are pretty good that if you’re an adult, you’ve had a question or two about sex in your life…and if you have young people in your life, they definitely have questions about sex. But some things have changed since you were young, what with social media and sexting and people identifying as having non-binary genders and the like, and it may be confusing and embarrassing to talk to your kids, especially if you don’t have the answers yourself.

At this Science on Tap, Dr. L. Kris Gowen, author of Sexual Decisions: The Ultimate Teen Guide, will talk about what’s new in teen sexuality (for example, did you know that teen pregnancy rates are down?), how to get reliable and trustworthy information about sex, what information is and is not being covered in schools, and how to talk about this subject with the young people in your life.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online, or check with the Kiggins’ box office) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event. (…and reserving a seat is recommended, since this topic will not doubt be popular.)

Science on Tap: ECLIPSE-O-MANIA!

The Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap —”The Sights, Safety, and Science of the Great American Eclipse”—at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 9, will answer every question you ever had about the upcoming total solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21. On this day, the continental United States will experience its first total eclipse since 1979, and its first coast-to-coast eclipse since 1918. With over 12 million people in the path of totality and nearly 200 million within a single day’s drive, this may become the most watched eclipse in world history. From what you can expect to see to how to stay safe to the current and historical science that eclipses have brought us, this talk should give you all the information you need for an unforgettable eclipse experience!

The speaker, Dr. Ethan Siegel, was born in New York, majored in three different things as an undergrad, and got his Ph.D. in theoretical physics. (See? It never hurts to be a little indecisive.) After postdoctoral research focusing on dark matter and cosmic structure formation, he became a physics professor and a professional science communicator. The communication was more fun, so now he writes and speaks full time, including for Forbes, and NASA. His blog, Starts With a Bang, was voted the internet’s top science blog by the Institute of Physics and also by Real Clear Science. His first book, Beyond the Galaxy, is available today (and yes, he has copies to sign), and his second, Treknology, about the real-life science behind the technologies envisioned by Star Trek, comes out in October.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online, or check with the Kiggins’ box office) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event. (…and reserving a seat is recommended, since this topic will not doubt be popular.)

Science on Tap: Eclipse-o-Mania!

The Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap —”The Sights, Safety, and Science of the Great American Eclipse”—at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 9, will answer every question you ever had about the upcoming total solar eclipse on Monday, Aug. 21. On this day, the continental United States will experience its first total eclipse since 1979, and its first coast-to-coast eclipse since 1918. With over 12 million people in the path of totality and nearly 200 million within a single day’s drive, this may become the most watched eclipse in world history. From what you can expect to see to how to stay safe to the current and historical science that eclipses have brought us, this talk should give you all the information you need for an unforgettable eclipse experience!

The speaker, Dr. Ethan Siegel, was born in New York, majored in three different things as an undergrad, and got his Ph.D. in theoretical physics. (See? It never hurts to be a little indecisive.) After postdoctoral research focusing on dark matter and cosmic structure formation, he became a physics professor and a professional science communicator. The communication was more fun, so now he writes and speaks full time, including for Forbes, and NASA. His blog, Starts With a Bang, was voted the internet’s top science blog by the Institute of Physics and also by Real Clear Science. His first book, Beyond the Galaxy, is available today (and yes, he has copies to sign), and his second, Treknology, about the real-life science behind the technologies envisioned by Star Trek, comes out in October.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online, or check with the Kiggins’ box office) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event. (…and reserving a seat is recommended, since this topic will not doubt be popular.)

Science on Tap: Decoding Feline Body Language

Dr. Tripp holds a doctorate in veterinary medicine as well as academic degrees in philosophy and music. He is an Affiliate Professor of Applied Animal Behavior at two veterinary schools, and certified by the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants. Dr. Tripp has published over 40 articles on pet behavior, and given over 100 lectures to veterinary associations. In addition to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, he has presented in England, Japan, Puerto Rico, and Canada. He has appeared on Animal Planet over 20 times as a content expert. Dr. Tripp has also spoken at several previous Science on Tap events in both Portland and Vancouver.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online, or check with the Kiggins’ box office) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event. (…and reserving a seat is recommended, since this particular topic tends to create a packed house.)

Science on Tap: Decoding Cats

The Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, July 12, is all about the strange and fascinating—although readily decipherable—ways that cats communicate with us and with each other. Have you ever watched a funny cat video (or your own cat) and wondered, “Why is the cat doing THAT?!” Dr. Rolan Tripp, veterinarian and animal behaviorist, will start with a basic introduction to feline body language. (Once you know what to look for, few things are as entertaining as “Cat Social Politics.”) Then we’ll analyze several internet cat videos, and after giggling, decode the underlying brain-muscle mechanisms of impulse control, reaction thresholds, and the fine line between quirky and crazy.

Dr. Tripp holds a doctorate in veterinary medicine as well as academic degrees in philosophy and music. He is an Affiliate Professor of Applied Animal Behavior at two veterinary schools, and certified by the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants. Dr. Tripp has published over 40 articles on pet behavior, and given over 100 lectures to veterinary associations. In addition to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, he has presented in England, Japan, Puerto Rico, and Canada. He has appeared on Animal Planet over 20 times as a content expert. Dr. Tripp has also spoken at several previous Science on Tap events in both Portland and Vancouver.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online, or check with the Kiggins’ box office) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event. (…and reserving a seat is recommended, since this particular topic tends to create a packed house.)

Science on Tap: The Neuroscience of Pain

The Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, June 14, is going to be a real pain. That’s because the topic is “The Neuroscience of Pain: The Good, The Very Bad, and the Ugly.” Pain is the most important and misunderstood sensory system: you cannot live without it, yet we live every day trying to avoid it. Dr. Michael Morgan cannot cure your pain (he’s not that kind of doctor), but he will explain how your nervous system codes pain, how your brain tries to control it, and how drugs provide relief. And don’t worry…his presentation will be entertaining and pain-free, especially if you listen while enjoying a craft brew from the Kiggins lobby.

Morgan is a Professor of Psychology at Washington State University Vancouver, and has studied the neural mechanisms of pain modulation for over thirty years. He earned a doctorate in Physiological Psychology from UCLA and conducted post-doctoral research in Neurology at UC San Francisco before joining the faculty at WSU Vancouver, where he’s won teaching and research awards. Dr. Morgan has also spoken about “The Neuroscience of Reality: Can You Trust Your Brain?” at several previous Science on Tap events.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online, or check with the Kiggins’ box office) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event.

Science on Tap: Chicks Dig Science!

Picture a scientist. What do you see? Beakers? Check. Lab coats? Check. Wild fuzzy hair? Check. Old white dude? Check. Girl? Not so much. Today, right now, girls are killing it in math and science. They are taking more science credits in high school than boys and earning higher grades. What they aren’t doing is choosing science careers. Why is that? What does science have to say about this persistent gender gap? Dr. Brandy Todd, a.k.a. Eugene SLUG Queen Professor Doctor Mildred Slugwak Dresselhaus, director of the Science Program to Inspire Creativity and Excellence (SPICE), has spent the last 10 years researching and implementing engaging, hands-on science with girls. At this next Science on Tap, Dr. Todd—in a presentation called “Girls, Goggles, and Blowing Stuff Up”—will dive deep into the obstacles girl scientists face, share what parents, teachers, and allies can do to support budding girls scientists, and extol the virtue of a wicked set of bangs. You can get advance tickets for this show here.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The presentation starts at 7 p.m., but the Kiggins will open its doors at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event.

Science on Tap: Evolution & BEER!

Have you ever sat down at a bar, ordered a beer, and thought to yourself, “Why do humans even have specific genes for breaking down alcohol?” The answer, as it turns out, takes you a long way back in human history; our relationship with yeast (the organism that makes alcohol) predates human evolution. At the Kiggins Theatre’s next Science on Tap, Dr. Kevin McCabe—Lab Supervisor at Full Sail Brewing and holder of a PhD in Molecular and Medical Genetics from OHSU—will take you through the history of primate alcohol consumption, the importance of yeast to human history, and how early microbiology turned the tables on yeast and gave humans control over our boozy destiny. The resulting presentation is “Evolution Under the Influence: Alcohol and the Coevolution of Humans and Yeast.” This evening of science, beer, facts and fun will begins at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, March 5. You can get advance tickets for this show here.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The doors open at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event.

Science on Tap: Evolution & BEER!

SOT_logo-fullColor_thumb_thumbHave you ever sat down at a bar, ordered a beer, and thought to yourself, “Why do humans even have specific genes for breaking down alcohol?” The answer, as it turns out, takes you a long way back in human history; our relationship with yeast (the organism that makes alcohol) predates human evolution. At the Kiggins Theatre’s next Science on Tap, Dr. Kevin McCabe—Lab Supervisor at Full Sail Brewing and holder of a PhD in Molecular and Medical Genetics from OHSU—will take you through the history of primate alcohol consumption, the importance of yeast to human history, and how early microbiology turned the tables on yeast and gave humans control over our boozy destiny. The resulting presentation is “Evolution Under the Influence: Alcohol and the Coevolution of Humans and Yeast.” This evening of science, beer, facts and fun will begins at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, March 8. You can get advance tickets for this show here.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions (“Better Learning Through Beer”) and Washington State University Vancouver. The doors open at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event.

Science on Tap: Games & the Origins of Life

Einstein famously said, “God does not play dice with the universe.” But could games have anything to do with the origins of life on Earth? At the Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap—”Game Theory, Cooperation, and the Theory of Life”—Dr. Niles Lehman, professor of chemistry at Portland State University, will introduce the concept of game theory and make a connection between game theory’s principles and how life may have arisen on the Earth some four billion years ago. Surprisingly there may be a link between strategies that “players” use when in competitions, and the strategies that molecules use to behave in a life-like fashion. This evening of science, beer, facts (actual, not alternative) and fun will begins at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 1. (Please note: this is one week earlier that usual; Science on Tap is normally held on the second Wednesday of the month.)

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions and Washington State University Vancouver. The doors open at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event.

Science on Tap: Games & the Theory of Life

Einstein famously said, “God does not play dice with the universe.” But could games have anything to do with the origins of life on Earth? At the Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap—”Game Theory, Cooperation, and the Theory of Life”—Dr. Niles Lehman, professor of chemistry at Portland State University, will introduce the concept of game theory and make a connection between game theory’s principles and how life may have arisen on the Earth some four billion years ago. Surprisingly there may be a link between strategies that “players” use when in competitions, and the strategies that molecules use to behave in a life-like fashion. This evening of science, beer, facts (actual, not alternative) and fun will begins at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 1. (Please note: this is one week earlier that usual; Science on Tap is normally held on the second Wednesday of the month.)

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions and Washington State University Vancouver. The doors open at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event.

Science on Tap: The Physics of Fun

Come to the Kiggins Theatre at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 11, for the lighter side of physics—more specifically, the Science Circus and the Physics of Fun with master juggler Rhys Thomas of JuggleMania. Often compared to the bubbly, bendy action of a Pixar movie, Science Circus blends mature science with comedy to create a show the Smithsonian Institution has called “wonderful.” Audience members will observe gravity’s constant acceleration through bowling ball juggling (?!), gyroscopic stability through glass bowl spinning, centripetal force with cowboy lariats, center of balance from a six-foot tall unicycle, and inertia with a classic tablecloth pull. Thomas will teach you about physics with hilarity and dexterity, describing and demonstrating physics concepts with the irresistible force of levity.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions and Washington State University Vancouver. The doors open at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event.

Science on Tap: the Physics of Fun

Editor’s note: due to the snowy weather, this event has been postponed until Wednesday, Jan. 25.

Come to the Kiggins Theatre at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 11, for the lighter side of physics—more specifically, the Science Circus and the Physics of Fun with master juggler Rhys Thomas of JuggleMania. Often compared to the bubbly, bendy action of a Pixar movie, Science Circus blends mature science with comedy to create a show the Smithsonian Institution has called “wonderful.” Audience members will observe gravity’s constant acceleration through bowling ball juggling (?!), gyroscopic stability through glass bowl spinning, centripetal force with cowboy lariats, center of balance from a six-foot tall unicycle, and inertia with a classic tablecloth pull. Thomas will teach you about physics with hilarity and dexterity, describing and demonstrating physics concepts with the irresistible force of levity.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions and Washington State University Vancouver. The doors open at 6 p.m. so you can find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online) or $10 suggested donation at the door. Science on Tap is largely supported by money collected at the door, but no one will be turned away for lack of a few dollars. Come anyway and donate what you can! Buying a ticket in advance merely confirms that you will have a seat at the event.

Above image: Rhys Thomas keeps a lot of bowls in the air; photo by Bowis M. Schmitt/JuggleMania

Science on Tap: A Scientific Approach to Dog Training

Most people raise dogs as if they are mini furry people, but they’re not. Canines are proud members of a different species with very different sensory systems and different social structure. At the next Science on Tap, veterinarian and animal behaviorist Dr. Rolan Tripp will talk about understanding how dogs think and why they behave the way they do. In his presentation, “A Scientific Approach to Raising an Ideal Dog,” he will show how to measure and graph both wanted and unwanted canine personality traits, and will give science-based suggestions on how to increase mutual trust, respect, and bonding with your dog.

Dr. Tripp holds a doctorate in veterinary medicine as well as academic degrees in Philosophy and Music. He is an Affiliate Professor of Applied Animal Behavior at two veterinary schools and certified by the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants. Dr. Tripp has published over 40 articles on pet behavior and given over 100 lectures to veterinary associations. In addition to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, he has presented in England, Japan, Puerto Rico, and Canada. He has also appeared on Animal Planet over 200 times as a content expert.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions and Washington State University Vancouver. The next Science on Tap is Wednesday, Nov. 9. The doors open at 6 p.m. to find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online) or $10 suggested donation at the door.

Science on Tap: A Scientific Approach to Dog Training

Most people raise dogs as if they are mini furry people, but they’re not. Canines are proud members of a different species with very different sensory systems and different social structure. At the next Science on Tap, veterinarian and animal behaviorist Dr. Rolan Tripp will talk about understanding how dogs think and why they behave the way they do. In his presentation, “A Scientific Approach to Raising an Ideal Dog,” he will show how to measure and graph both wanted and unwanted canine personality traits, and will give science-based suggestions on how to increase mutual trust, respect, and bonding with your dog.

Dr. Tripp holds a doctorate in veterinary medicine as well as academic degrees in Philosophy and Music. He is an Affiliate Professor of Applied Animal Behavior at two veterinary schools and certified by the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants. Dr. Tripp has published over 40 articles on pet behavior and given over 100 lectures to veterinary associations. In addition to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, he has presented in England, Japan, Puerto Rico, and Canada. He has also appeared on Animal Planet over 200 times as a content expert.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions and Washington State University Vancouver. The next Science on Tap is Wednesday, Nov. 9. The doors open at 6 p.m. to find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online) or $10 suggested donation at the door.

Science on Tap: The Lasting Effects of Childhood Trauma

Your experiences in early childhood are not just the beginning of your life story—they set the tone for how you will respond to life events for years to come. Childhood experiences that are consistently stressful or traumatic get “under the skin” and shape the brain and the body in ways that put us at risk for mental and physical health problems as adults. These experiences can also affect the way we parent our children. At this Science on Tap, Waters will discuss her research on how parents transmit stress to their children and intervention programs that help heal the effects of early trauma.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions and Washington State University Vancouver. The next Science on Tap is Wednesday, Oct. 12. The doors open at 6 p.m. to find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online) or $10 suggested donation at the door.

Science on Tap: What Doesn’t Kill You…

…doesn’t actually make you stronger. In fact, it may scar you for life. At October’s Science on Tap, Sara Waters, PhD, professor of Human Development at WSU Vancouver, will talk about how and why traumatic childhood experiences stay inside our minds and bodies for a lifetime and what we can do about it.

Your experiences in early childhood are not just the beginning of your life story—they set the tone for how you will respond to life events for years to come. Childhood experiences that are consistently stressful or traumatic get “under the skin” and shape the brain and the body in ways that put us at risk for mental and physical health problems as adults. These experiences can also affect the way we parent our children. At this Science on Tap, Waters will discuss her research on how parents transmit stress to their children and intervention programs that help heal the effects of early trauma.

Science on Tap is a monthly lecture series at the Kiggins Theatre, offered in partnership with Via Productions and Washington State University Vancouver. The next Science on Tap is Wednesday, Oct. 12. The doors open at 6 p.m. to find a seat and purchase yummy refreshments: beer, wine, soda, pizza, and theater-style popcorn and candy. Tickets are $8 in advance (click here to purchase online) or $10 suggested donation at the door.