Mount St. Helens

Family-Friendly Winter Reopening Celebration at the Mount St. Helens Science and Learning Center

As winter approaches, visitors may be looking for things to do on the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, part of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The Mount St. Helens Institute is hosting an event from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 4, to mark the winter reopening of the Science and Learning Center at Coldwater. Beginning Nov. 4, visitors to Mount St. Helens can explore the Science and Learning Center on weekends while the Johnston Ridge Observatory is closed for the winter season. The event features live music by Raeann Phillips, art workshops with biologist and artist Natalie Tonn, Forest Service Ranger talks, volcano and winter themed crafts, a Mount St. Helens photo booth, lunch on-site, a gift shop, and more. A full schedule is available at http://www.mshslc.org/events/#slcopening. A $10 suggested donation includes lunch and all activities.

The Science and Learning Center is open weekends from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. through mid-May, when the Johnston Ridge Observatory reopens for the summer. Visitors to the Science and Learning Center during winter can enjoy a hike or snowshoe on nearby trails around the monument, watch two films about the 1980 eruption, pick up a souvenir at the gift shop, and learn fascinating facts from employees and volunteers who love sharing information about this special landscape.

National Public Lands Day: Explore for Free!

National Public Lands Day is Saturday, Sept. 30, one of several fee-free days in 2017 observed by the U.S. Forest Service to encourage everyone to experience their public lands. Fees are waived at most federal day-use areas, such as picnic grounds, developed trailheads, and visitor centers. In Southwest Washington, that means that every recreational site on Gifford Pinchot National Forest land is free for you to explore—as is the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. (Fees for camping and cabin rentals still apply, FYI.) To find a recreation site near you, visit this interactive recreation map.

And here’s a bonus for families of fourth graders: as part of the national Every Kid in a Park initiative, all fourth graders and their families can claim their free Every Kid in a Park pass, which allows free entry into and use of all federal parks, forests, and recreation areas for a full year. Fourth graders can print out a paper voucher for free entry into and use of all federal lands by visiting the Every Kid in a Park website at www.everykidinapark.gov. Students and their families can also redeem their paper voucher for a plastic pass at any Forest Service office. The voucher and passes are valid for the entire school year, from now through Aug. 31, 2018.

The Gifford Pinchot National Forest encompasses over 1.3 million acres of land owned by the American public. For more information about National Public Lands Day, visit www.publiclandsday.org.

National Public Lands Day: Explore for Free!

National Public Lands Day is Saturday, Sept. 30, one of several fee-free days in 2017 observed by the U.S. Forest Service to encourage everyone to experience their public lands. Fees are waived at most federal day-use areas, such as picnic grounds, developed trailheads, and visitor centers. In Southwest Washington, that means that every recreational site on Gifford Pinchot National Forest land is free for you to explore—as is the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. (Fees for camping and cabin rentals still apply, FYI.) To find a recreation site near you, visit this interactive recreation map.

And here’s a bonus for families of fourth graders: as part of the national Every Kid in a Park initiative, all fourth graders and their families can claim their free Every Kid in a Park pass, which allows free entry into and use of all federal parks, forests, and recreation areas for a full year. Fourth graders can print out a paper voucher for free entry into and use of all federal lands by visiting the Every Kid in a Park website at www.everykidinapark.gov. Students and their families can also redeem their paper voucher for a plastic pass at any Forest Service office. The voucher and passes are valid for the entire school year, from now through Aug. 31, 2018.

The Gifford Pinchot National Forest encompasses over 1.3 million acres of land owned by the American public. For more information about National Public Lands Day, visit www.publiclandsday.org.

Above image: a hiker walks through Indian Heaven Wilderness. Photo courtesy of Gifford Pinchot National Forest; see more on its Facebook page.

Mount St. Helens Sky and Star Party

Attend a Sky and Star Party at the Science and Learning Center on Saturday, Sept. 16. The event—hosted by the Mount St. Helens Institute and others—features talks by former NASA astronaut Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger and others, live music by Jawbone Flats, telescope viewing, astronomy-themed crafts, dinner, and more. The event will happen rain or shine, and is open to the public from 3 p.m. to midnight. A suggested donation of $10 per person includes all speakers, activities, and dinner. Overnight reservations are available for those who want to stay late to view dark sky objects and camp out. Camping reservations are available online at http://www.mshslc.org/events. The cost is $30 per person and includes camping, breakfast, and a guided morning walk or hike in addition to all of the public events.

Bring the kids to enjoy astronomy crafts from 3 to 5 p.m., followed by a pasta dinner and live music from Jawbone Flats from 5 to 7 p.m. At 7 p.m., hear stories from Metcalf-Lindenburger at 7 p.m. Greg Cermac, NASA’s Solar System Ambassador, will also share information on volcanism in the inner solar system at 3 p.m. Howard Knytych, Mt. Hood Community College instructor and Rose City Astronomers member, will speak about cryvolcanism and Pluto at 4 p.m.

In the evening, amateur astronomers from Friends of Galileo and the Rose City Astronomers will share their telescopes and enthusiasm for the night sky, giving the public an opportunity to see some deep sky objects. An introduction will begin at 8 p.m., followed by telescope viewing and a guided constellation identification walk. Sky viewing is weather dependent. Day of weather updates will be posted to Facebook at www.tinyurl.com/2017mshsky. The full schedule is online at www.mshslc.org/events/#skyandstar.

Art Eruption: Day of Creativity at Mount St. Helens

Come up to the Science and Learning Center at Mount St. Helens, where you can join the “Art Eruption” on Saturday, June 10. Create art inspired by the amazing landscape and take home your own, very personal piece of Mount St. Helens. This day of creativity includes mixed media art workshops, kids’ art workshops, naturalist-guided walks, live music with Lewi Longmire and the Left Coast Roasters, and food. Photo scavenger hunts will also take place around the building throughout the day. Or, if you prefer, you can bring your own art project to work on: knitting, crocheting, drawing, painting—whatever makes you happy! Here’s the schedule of activities:

  • Mixed Media Art Workshops: 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m., $15 (includes event admission). Use ink, paint, and smoke to make a one-of-a-kind print to take home. The workshop will be guided by award-winning water media painters Susie Cowan and Lee Baughman of Art-Adventures.com. This workshop is best suited for youth 16+ and adults.  All backgrounds and skill levels are welcome. The workshop includes instruction and all supplies.
  • Youth Nature Art Workshops: noon to 1 p.m. and 3 to 4 p.m., $10 (includes event admission). Explore drawing and painting natural objects such as insects, moss, and rocks to create one or more prints to take home. The workshop will be guided by scientist and nature artist, Natalie Tonn. This workshop is best suited for kids over age six. All backgrounds and skill levels welcome. The workshop includes instruction and all supplies.
  • Naturalist Guided Walks: 11 to 11:45 a.m. and 2 to 2:45 p.m.: Learn about the 1980 eruption from the ¼ mile Winds of Change Trail from a trained ranger or naturalist. The path is paved but has some steep sections. This is a family-friendly walk.
  • Crafts and Activities: all day! Create a shrink plastic necklace or window charm, card or banner (Father’s Day is coming), get nature themed face painting from 3 to 5 p.m., make a Mount St. Helens diorama, join the photo scavenger hunt, and take a photo in the photo booth station.
  • Lunch: Potato & Salad Bar, 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., $7 for adults or $5 for kids, students, and seniors.

The Mount St. Helens Science and Learning Center is located at 19000 Spirit Lake Highway (Milepost 43.3, State Route 504) in Toutle. For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page, call 360-274-2114 or email rent@mshinstitute.org. You can also get more information about “Summer on the Mountain” events at http://www.mshslc.org/events/.

Above image: a happy participant in last year’s Art Eruption!

Special Presentation About Mt. St. Helens at the Fort

On Saturday, May 20, from 1 to 3 p.m. at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center, U.S. Forest Service Monument Scientist Peter Frenzen will discuss his work at Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens leveled more than 200 square miles of forest and captured the imagination of volcano enthusiasts around the world. This summer, Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument will celebrate its 35th year of providing for the preservation and public enjoyment of one of North America’s youngest and most dynamic natural landscapes. The area surrounding the volcano has become an important laboratory for the study of volcanic processes and ecosystem response to large-scale disturbance. Frenzen will describe more than three decades of landscape change and lessons learned at one of the world’s most studied and accessible volcanoes. Repeat photographs will reveal amazing changes that have taken place in a matter of minutes, over decades, and during the volcano’s 2004-2008 dome-building eruption.

Frenzen is responsible for administering research and incorporating research findings into visitor information and education programs. He is a passionate advocate for inquiry-based science education and was part of a team that developed a kit-based hands-on science program for schools that has been implemented across the state of Washington. During his 30-year career at Mount St. Helens, Frenzen has helped create award-winning exhibits, films, and engaging stories for numerous feature stories and science documentaries. He has also assisted with public information at large fires and international efforts to develop parks and protected areas to preserve natural ecosystems, reduce hazards exposure, and promote sustainable tourism in nearby communities.

“Mount St. Helens: 37 Years of Ecosystem Development and Landscape Change,” is a free event presented by the U.S. Forest Service and the Friends of Fort Vancouver, in partnership with Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. The Fort Vancouver Visitor Center is located at 1501 East Evergreen Blvd. on the Fort Vancouver grounds.

“It’s a Blast!” Summer Kick-Off at Mount St. Helens

Visit the Science and Learning Center for kids’ activities, crafts, guided hikes, and music from Amber Sweeney. Admission is $8 per person and benefits Mount St. Helens Institute’s education and volunteer programs. The event is free for children 15 and younger and federal recreation pass holders.  Both facilities will be open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Here’s the schedule at the Science and Learning Center:

  • 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.—OMSI brain teasers and animal artifacts, education activities and crafts, photo booth station with props
  • 11 a.m.-1 p.m. —Guided Hummocks Trail Hike (meet at Hummocks Trailhead)
  • Noon—TRASHCANO! demonstration
  • 12:30 p.m.—TRASHCANO! demonstration
  • 1 to 4 p.m.—Music by soul/rock songwriter Amber Sweeney Trio at the Science and Learning Center
  • 2 to 4 p.m.—Guided Hummocks Trail Hike (meet at Hummocks Trailhead)
  • 2 p.m.—TRASHCANO! demonstration
  • 3 p.m.—Guided walk on Winds of Change Trail
  • 4 p.m.—TRASHCANO! demonstration

Check here for more details: http://www.mshslc.org/events/. The Mount St. Helens Institute is a 501(c) (3) private, nonprofit organization that advances understanding and stewardship of the earth through science, education and exploration of volcanic landscapes. For more information, visit www.mshinstitute.org or contact Ray Yurkewycz at ryurkewycz@mshinstitute.org or 360-891-5069.

Art Eruption

Come up to the Science and Learning Center at Mount St. Helens, where you can join the “Art Eruption” from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 6. Create art inspired by the amazing landscape and take home your own, very personal piece of Mount St. Helens. This event—which is open to the public and welcome to participants of all ages and art experiences—gives you everything you need to create amazing art.

Susie Cowan and Lee Baughman of Art-Adventures.com (and popular teachers at Clark College) will lead three mixed media art (ink, watercolor, and smoke) workshops. Workshops will run from 10 to 11:30 a.m., noon to 1:30 p.m., and 2:30 to 4 p.m. Click here to register for a workshop. The cost is $15 per person and includes materials and step-by-step instruction to create two paintings. Each workshop will be limited to 30 participants.

Participants will be given supplies to create a Mount St. Helens diorama or a shrink-plastic necklace or window hang—as well as other, more creative options. Photo scavenger hunts will also take place around the building throughout the day. Or, if you prefer, you can bring your own art project to work on: knitting, crocheting, drawing, painting, and more.

The Mount St. Helens Science and Learning Center is located at 19000 Spirit Lake Highway (Milepost 43.3, State Route 504) in Toutle. For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page, call 360-274-2114 or email rent@mshinstitute.org.

Guided Summer Hikes on Mount St. Helens

Get to know Mount St. Helens through the eyes of an expert on a guided summer hike. There are several to choose from, and each one will give you a different view on our favorite local volcano. For more information about any of the hikes listed below, or to register for on of the hikes, call the Mount St. Helens Institute at 360-449-7883 or e-mail info@mshinstitute.org. You can also get more details about the hikes at www.mshinstitute.org.

  • June 25: Geology and Biology in the Heart of the Blast Zone. Do you love volcanoes and want to learn more about them while hiking in the shadow of Mount St. Helens? Join expert staff naturalist, Bob Appling, for geological and biological stories of renewal at Mount St. Helens.
  • July 9-10: Dynamic Forces in Nature and Ourselves: a Yoga and Hiking Retreat. Relax with yoga instructor Jillian Chong at Windy Ridge on an all-inclusive hike and yoga retreat filled with adventure and rejuvenation.
  • Aug. 4-7: Loowit Trail Backpacking Adventure. The Loowit Trail is one of the top backpacking trips in the Pacific Northwest. See the volcano from every angle on this awe-inspiring and challenging four-day guided trip, learning about the natural history of Mount St. Helens while immersed in it.
  • Aug. 13: The Awesome Hike! Perhaps the most spectacular single day hike in the Mount St. Helens area, this guided 10-mile jaunt is the perfect introduction to hiking on Mount St. Helens. Travel along the spine of Johnston Ridge, wind through the heart of the blast zone in the Mount Margaret backcountry, past Coldwater Peak and south along Coldwater Ridge. At the end of the day, hikers will be driven back to their cars (avoiding the 2,000-foot climb back up Johnston Ridge).

Volcano Views & Brews at Skamania Lodge: 36th Anniversary of Mount St. Helens’ eruption

There’s a special Volcano Views and Brews coming up on Wednesday, May 18—the 36th anniversary of the eruption of Mt. St. Helens on May 18, 1980. This time, everyone will meet at the beautiful Skamania Lodge in Stevenson, located on a bluff overlooking the Columbia River at 1131 S.W. Skamania Lodge Way.

All ages are welcome to attend this event, which will begin at 6:30 p.m. Guests are encouraged to arrive as early as 5:30 for dinner at the River Rock restaurant or in the swanky Cascade Room. There is a $5 suggested donation to hear the presentation, which will feature Bob Tokarczyk. Tokarczyk spent much of his career working on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, beginning at Spirit Lake in 1946, and was the Forest Supervisor during the 1980 eruption. Tokarczyk will relate a few of his incredible first-person accounts of the eruption and aftermath—stories that could only be told by someone who was present at one of the biggest and most striking natural disasters in North America during the last century. (To learn more, read some of Tokarczyk’s bio at Check out Bob’s extensive biography by clicking here.)

The Volcano Views and Brews series is a regular event that’s a partnership between the Mount St. Helens Institute and local brewpubs and eateries in the Portland/Vancouver area. To learn more about the Mount St. Helens Institute, visit www.mshinstitute.org.

Volcano Views & Brews at Skamania Lodge

There’s a special Volcano Views and Brews coming up on Wednesday, May 18—the 36th anniversary of the eruption of Mt. St. Helens on May 18, 1980. This time, everyone will meet at the beautiful Skamania Lodge in Stevenson, located on a bluff overlooking the Columbia River at 1131 S.W. Skamania Lodge Way.

All ages are welcome to attend this event, which will begin at 6:30 p.m. Guests are encouraged to arrive as early as 5:30 for dinner at the River Rock restaurant or in the swanky Cascade Room. There is a $5 suggested donation to hear the presentation, which will feature Bob Tokarczyk. Tokarczyk spent much of his career working on the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, beginning at Spirit Lake in 1946, and was the Forest Supervisor during the 1980 eruption. Tokarczyk will relate a few of his incredible first-person accounts of the eruption and aftermath—stories that could only be told by someone who was present at one of the biggest and most striking natural disasters in North America during the last century. (To learn more, read some of Tokarczyk’s bio at Check out Bob’s extensive biography by clicking here.)

The Volcano Views and Brews series is a regular event that’s a partnership between the Mount St. Helens Institute and local brewpubs and eateries in the Portland/Vancouver area. To learn more about the Mount St. Helens Institute, visit www.mshinstitute.org.

Summer’s a Blast on Mount St. Helens

“Summer on the Mountain” begins on Saturday, May 14, with “It’s a Blast” at Johnston Ridge, plus family-friendly science activities at the Science and Learning Center. The Johnston Ridge Observatory has interpretive displays that tell the biological, geological, and human story of Mount St. Helens. Visitors can also enjoy award-winning films, listen to ranger talks, observe the landscape, purchase souvenirs, go on a hike, or enjoy a light lunch from the food cart.

On Wednesday, May 18, the 36th anniversary of the 1980 eruption will be commemorated by special presentations at both Johnston Ridge and at the Science and Learning Center. For more information, visit www.mshslc.org/events. Information about educational programs and facility rentals at the Science and Learning Center is available at www.mshinstitute.org or by emailing the Mount St. Helens Institute at rent@mshinstitute.org. In the meantime, here’s the Summer on the Mountain schedule:

  • May 14: It’s A Blast—amazing stories, hands-on activities and the return of the amazing “trashcano”
  • June 25: Music on the Mountain—outdoor music celebration at the Johnston Ridge Observatory
  • July 9: Sky and Star Party—see the sky in a whole new way with the Friends of Galileo Astronomy Club. Camping is by reservation; email rent@mshinstitute.org.
  • Aug. 6: Art Eruption—make your own mini Mount St. Helens, go on a photo scavenger hunt, make a painting, and more
  • Sept. 3-4: Family Camp—activities and adventure for the entire family on Labor Day weekend. Registration is required at mshinstitute.org.
  • Oct. 1: Carnival of Color—celebrate the season’s fall colors with a day of fun, art, carnival games, and prizes

Mt. St. Helens Winter Aventures

The Mount St. Helens Institute (MSHI) has released its 2015 winter adventures schedule, featuring snowshoeing and hiking. If there’s snow in the ground, adventurers will use snowshoes and poles; if not, they’ll go by foot (or by snowboot, as the case may be). The winter adventures begin Saturday, Jan. 23, with a trek along the June Lake Trail Loop on the south side of Mount St. Helens. There are two adventures in January, four in February, and three more in March, ending on March 19 with an exploration of Goat Marsh.

The winter adventures are led by volcano naturalists Bob and Katherine Appling along with MSHI Mountain Steward volunteers. Participants will learn the basic skills of snowshoeing while also gaining knowledge about winter wildlife tracking, geology and biology. In short: it’s a beautiful and educational workout, with hot chocolate at the end.

The cost per participant is $45. If you don’t have snowshoes, no worries! Snowshoes with trekking poles are available to rent for $15 per person. To see a complete list of necessary gear, click here. Participants will need to provide their own lunches and transportation to the trailheads. For more information and to sign up for a winter adventure, visit MSHI’s website at www.mshinstitute.org—or see the complete schedule below and click on each link for details:

Volcano Views & Brews: Fishers Make a Comeback

What’s cuter than a ferret but wilder than a weasel? (Ferret owners may insist that NOTHING is cuter than a ferret, but everyone is entitled to his or her own opinion regarding polecats.) Give up? It’s the fisher—Martes pennent—a native of the Washington Cascades that was wiped out in the last century due to trapping and habitat loss. Now, fishers are being successfully reintroduced to the woods of Washington, including many sites in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest near Mount St. Helens.

Come to the next Volcano Views and Brews at Loowit Brewing on Tuesday, Jan. 19. You’ll see LOTS of adorable pictures of fishers and hear the dramatic story of their return during the presentation by Dr. Tara Chestnut, a wildlife ecologist and an instrumental part of the team that has made the wild fisher comeback possible.

Loowit will open its doors at 5 p.m. so that you can find a good seat, order some amazing brewed-on-site craft beer, get some munchies, and talk about volcanoes and stuff with your friends. The presentation begins at 6:30 and the event will go until about 8 p.m. There’s a $5 suggested donation. Loowit Brewing is located at 507 Columbia St. in downtown Vancouver. Volcano Views and Brews is held once a month and is sponsored by the Mount St. Helens Institute. For more information, visit www.mshinstitute.org.

Guided Crater Hikes of Mt. St. Helens

The Mount St. Helens Institute is leading multiple guided trips this summer for an up-close view of Crater Glacier from a vantage point on the north side of Mount St. Helens.

The eight-mile hike begins at Windy Ridge and crosses the Pumice Plain—ground zero during the 1980 eruption and an area that has seen a remarkable resurgence of life in the past 35 years. Participants then climb to a vantage point at 5,300 feet with an eye-level, panoramic view of Crater Glacier, the lava domes formed during the 1980-1986 and 2004-2008 eruptive periods and spectacular Loowit Falls cascading out of the crater.

Along the way, Mount St. Helens Institute guides share natural history knowledge of the resilient landscape as participants enjoy views of nearby Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Spirit Lake, Mt. Margaret Backcountry and Goat Rocks Wilderness.

Crater Glacier View Climbs are offered weekends through Sept. 12. The cost for this adventure is $195 (…and $145 of that is a tax-deductible donation). For more information and to sign up for this climb, visit http://bit.ly/CraterGlacierViewClimb. To see a video of the climb, check out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTjG0sfUKfM.

Free Lecture: Life Returns to St. Helens Blast Zone

When Mount St. Helens blew, it devastated plant and animal life for miles. Thirty-five years later, the landscape is still utterly changed, yet nevertheless teeming with new life. From 3 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, June 18, you can learn all about this fascinating transformation during “After the Eruption, Life Is Tenacious,” a free lecture by Mount St. Helens Institute volcano naturalist David Newcomb.

How life is coming back to the Mount Saint Helens blast zone? Did anything survive the May 1980 eruption, and what were the factors that made the difference between survival and death? Which plants and animals were the first pioneers to venture back into the blast zone? What has surprised the biologists? And just what is this “succession” thing that those biologists speak of? Most of all, why are these things important to the human community that still lives and works and plays within sight of this still-active volcano?

All of these questions—and more—will be answered during Newcomb’s presentation, part two of a two-part series. But don’t worry if you missed the first lecture, because this one covers new ground and will give you plenty to think about. The lecture is happening at Clearwater Springs Senior Living, 201 N.W. 78th St. in Vancouver.

 

Life in St. Helens Blast Zone

When Mount St. Helens blew, it devastated plant and animal life for miles. Thirty-five years later, the landscape is still utterly changed, yet nevertheless teeming with new life. From 3 to 4 p.m. on Thursday, June 18, you can learn all about this fascinating transformation during “After the Eruption, Life Is Tenacious,” a free lecture by Mount St. Helens Institute volcano naturalist David Newcomb.

How life is coming back to the Mount Saint Helens blast zone? Did anything survive the May 1980 eruption, and what were the factors that made the difference between survival and death? Which plants and animals were the first pioneers to venture back into the blast zone? What has surprised the biologists? And just what is this “succession” thing that those biologists speak of? Most of all, why are these things important to the human community that still lives and works and plays within sight of this still-active volcano?

All of these questions—and more—will be answered during Newcomb’s presentation, part two of a two-part series. But don’t worry if you missed the first lecture, because this one covers new ground and will give you plenty to think about. The lecture is happening at Clearwater Springs Senior Living, 201 N.W. 78th St. in Vancouver.

Above image: life returns to the slopes of Mount St. Helens. Photo by Mary Liz Austin.

Volcano Views & Brews: Eruption Anniversary Events

Where were you when the mountain blew? (If you weren’t born yet, it doesn’t count.) If you grew up on the North Bank before 1980, Mount St. Helen’s frosty pointed top was part of your everyday landscape, and you may have vacationed or camped or hiked on its verdant lower slopes. You may have swum or fished or canoed into the clear silver-blue waters of Spirit Lake. If you were anywhere in Southwest Washington during the May 18, 1980 eruption—if you saw the plume or heard the boom—or if you have vivid memories of adventures on Mount St. Helens before or after the blast, you’re invited to share your story at any one of these Volcano Views & Brews eruption anniversary events:

Bring photos, scrapbooks, and other items to share. There is a suggested donation of $5 per person. Food and beverages are available separately for purchase. Doors open at 5 p.m. at all locations, followed by presentation from a guest speaker at 6:30 p.m. All ages are welcome, except Hop-N-Grape, which is over 21 only. More information is available at www.mshinstitute.org., or contact Ray Yurkewycz at ryurkewycz@mshinstitute.org or 360-891-5069.

Volcano Views & Brews: Eruption Anniversary Events

Where were you when the mountain blew? (If you weren’t born yet, it doesn’t count.) If you grew up on the North Bank before 1980, Mount St. Helen’s frosty pointed top was part of your everyday landscape, and you may have vacationed or camped or hiked on its verdant lower slopes. You may have swum or fished or canoed into the clear silver-blue waters of Spirit Lake. If you were anywhere in Southwest Washington during the May 18, 1980 eruption—if you saw the plume or heard the boom—or if you have vivid memories of adventures on Mount St. Helens before or after the blast, you’re invited to share your story at any one of these Volcano Views & Brews eruption anniversary events:

Bring photos, scrapbooks, and other items to share. There is a suggested donation of $5 per person. Food and beverages are available separately for purchase. Doors open at 5 p.m. at all locations, followed by presentation from a guest speaker at 6:30 p.m. All ages are welcome, except Hop-N-Grape, which is over 21 only. More information is available at www.mshinstitute.org., or contact Ray Yurkewycz at ryurkewycz@mshinstitute.org or 360-891-5069.

It’s a Blast: Eruption Anniversary Events at Mount St. Helens

The Gifford Pinchot National Forest and Mount St. Helens Institute invite you to join us for three days of 1980 eruption anniversary events Saturday, May 16, through Monday, May 18.

From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, May 16, “It’s a Blast” is the theme for the season’s opening day at Johnston Ridge Observatory, which overlooks the dramatic crater of Mount St. Helens. This is a family-friendly science education event with admission fees ($8 adults, kids free) supporting the non-profit Mount St. Helens Institute’s volcano volunteer and education programs. More details are available at www.mshinstitute.org.

From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, May 17, you can hear “Eruption Eyewitness Stories,” an event at the Science and Learning Center that features a series of 30-minunte talks by people whose lives were forever altered by their experiences at Mount St. Helens. Photos and stories describe the incredible events leading up to the catastrophic 1980 eruption and the massive landslide, lateral blast, mudflows and ash cloud that followed. Meet eruption eyewitnesses and leave with an autographed poster or book.  Admission is free. Click here for event details.

On Monday, May 18, join Forest Service officials at 10:30 a.m. for a ceremony commemorating the 1980 eruption at the Science and Learning Center. From noon to 4 p.m., there will be a celebration of 35 years of science discovery featuring 20-minunte presentations by scientists describing their amazing discoveries at the volcano, free posters, and hands-on science demonstrations. Visitors will also have the opportunity to meet a remote “spider,” an instrument package used to monitor eruptions at active volcanoes. Admission is free. Click here for event information.