Liberty Theatre

The National Theatre’s “Amadeus”

If, like me, you remember the 1984 film “Amadeus” with some fondness—weren’t Tom Hulce and F. Murray Abraham absolutely brilliant in their roles as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and rival composer Antonio Salieri?—then you’ll want to take note of the National Theatre’s spectacular production of the eponymous play on which the movie was based. It’s showing at the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 18, and again at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 22.

In case you missed the 1984 movie, or have never seen the play, which was written by Peter Shaffer and originally performed in 1979—and which, in turn, was based on a short 1830 play by Alexander Pushkin called “Mozart and Salieri”—the National Theatre’s production is a splendid introduction to this story that has captivated generation after generation of viewers. (In fact, Pushkin’s play was eventually used as the basis for an 1897 operetta by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.) But labyrinthine iterations aside, you’ll be enchanted not just by the story but also by the richly costumed actors and beautifully imagined sets. As for the plot, it’s simple but compelling: Mozart, a rowdy young prodigy, arrives in Vienna, the music capital of the world, and he’s determined to make a splash. Awestruck by his genius, court composer Salieri has the power to promote his talent or destroy his name. Seized by obsessive jealousy, Salieri begins a war with Mozart…with music…and, ultimately, with God.

Tickets are $18.50 general admission or $15 for students and seniors. The play, which is specially adapted for cinematic viewing, will be shown in the Liberty Theatre’s Granada Studio. The Liberty Theatre is located at 315 N.E. 4th Ave. in downtown Camas. For more details, visit www.camasliberty.com.

The National Theatre’s “Amadeus”

If, like me, you remember the 1984 film “Amadeus” with some fondness—weren’t Tom Hulce and F. Murray Abraham absolutely brilliant in their roles as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and rival composer Antonio Salieri?—then you’ll want to take note of the National Theatre’s spectacular production of the eponymous play on which the movie was based. It’s showing at the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 18, and again at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 22.

In case you missed the 1984 movie, or have never seen the play, which was written by Peter Shaffer and originally performed in 1979—and which, in turn, was based on a short 1830 play by Alexander Pushkin called “Mozart and Salieri”—the National Theatre’s production is a splendid introduction to this story that has captivated generation after generation of viewers. (In fact, Pushkin’s play was eventually used as the basis for an 1897 operetta by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov.) But labyrinthine iterations aside, you’ll be enchanted not just by the story but also by the richly costumed actors and beautifully imagined sets. As for the plot, it’s simple but compelling: Mozart, a rowdy young prodigy, arrives in Vienna, the music capital of the world, and he’s determined to make a splash. Awestruck by his genius, court composer Salieri has the power to promote his talent or destroy his name. Seized by obsessive jealousy, Salieri begins a war with Mozart…with music…and, ultimately, with God.

Tickets are $18.50 general admission or $15 for students and seniors. The play, which is specially adapted for cinematic viewing, will be shown in the Liberty Theatre’s Granada Studio. The Liberty Theatre is located at 315 N.E. 4th Ave. in downtown Camas. For more details, visit www.camasliberty.com.

Above image: detail from publicity photo by Marc Brenner

Deconstructing Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

May I introduce to you the act you’ve known for all these years” It’s The Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” and I think we can all agree—especially me, because I’m writing this and I’m a dyed-in-the-wool fan—that it’s one of the most influential albums of our time. But I’m not alone in my estimation; Rolling Stone described the album as “the most important rock & roll album ever made,” (see?) and “an unsurpassed adventure in concept, sound, songwriting, cover art and studio technology by the greatest rock & roll group of all time.” (So there!)

In the documentary film, “Deconstructing Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” composer, musician, and Beatles expert Scott Freiman looks at Sgt. Pepper from multiple angles, exploring the history behind the music. Freiman conducts an educational journey into the creative process of The Beatles performances and recording sessions. Whether or not you’re a Beatles fan—and especially if you are—you’ll be astonished The Beatles’ innovations in the studio and have a newfound appreciation for the talents of Lennon, McCartney, Harrison, and Starr.

The Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas is showing this film in its main theater at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, and at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 15. Ticket prices are $8. To learn more, visit http://www.beatleslectures.com/. For more information about other film’s playing at one of the North Bank’s best indie theaters, visit www.camasliberty.com.

Deconstructing Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band

May I introduce to you the act you’ve known for all these years” It’s The Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” and I think we can all agree—especially me, because I’m writing this and I’m a dyed-in-the-wool fan—that it’s one of the most influential albums of our time. But I’m not alone in my estimation; Rolling Stone described the album as “the most important rock & roll album ever made,” (see?) and “an unsurpassed adventure in concept, sound, songwriting, cover art and studio technology by the greatest rock & roll group of all time.” (So there!)

In the documentary film, “Deconstructing Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” composer, musician, and Beatles expert Scott Freiman looks at Sgt. Pepper from multiple angles, exploring the history behind the music. Freiman conducts an educational journey into the creative process of The Beatles performances and recording sessions. Whether or not you’re a Beatles fan—and especially if you are—you’ll be astonished The Beatles’ innovations in the studio and have a newfound appreciation for the talents of Lennon, McCartney, Harrison, and Starr.

The Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas is showing this film in its main theater at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, and at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 15. Ticket prices are $8. To learn more, visit http://www.beatleslectures.com/. For more information about other film’s playing at one of the North Bank’s best indie theaters, visit www.camasliberty.com.

The Sleeping Beauty

Everyone needs a bit of fairytale inspiration now and then…and there’s hardly a tale more beautifully told than “The Sleeping Beauty,” as performed by the Bolshoi Ballet. You can see this richly staged production at the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas at 12:55 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 5, and again at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 8.

The Bolshoi dancers take viewers on a dream-like journey through this beloved story, complete with jewel fairies, a magical kingdom, a youthful princess, and a handsome prince—all in the pure style of classical ballet. The Bolshoi’s sumptuous staging with its luxurious sets and costumes gives imaginative new life to Perrault’s fairytale. The Bolshoi’s young and rising star Olga Smirnova dances the part of Princess Aurora, who falls for Fairy Carabosse’s (danced by Alexei Loparevich) trick and falls into a slumber of 100 years. Semyon Chudin dances the role of Prince Désiré, whose kiss will eventually bring her back to life.

Running time is about two hours and 25 minutes, including intermission. General admission is $15 or $12 for seniors over 60 and children under age 15. The Liberty Theatre is located at 315 N.E. 4th Ave. in downtown Camas. This film is part of Liberty Theatre’s “Event Cinema” series, featuring film-format operas, ballets, musicals, plays, and great orchestral works. To find out more about what’s showing at the Liberty, visit www.camasliberty.com.

Deconstructing Sgt. Pepper

May I introduce to you the act you’ve known for all these years” It’s The Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” and I think we can all agree—especially me, because I’m writing this and I’m a dyed-in-the-wool fan—that it’s one of the most influential albums of our time. But I’m not alone in my estimation; Rolling Stone described the album as “the most important rock & roll album ever made,” (see?) and “an unsurpassed adventure in concept, sound, songwriting, cover art and studio technology by the greatest rock & roll group of all time.” (So there!)

In the documentary film, “Deconstructing Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band,” composer, musician, and Beatles expert Scott Freiman looks at Sgt. Pepper from multiple angles, exploring the history behind the music. Freiman conducts an educational journey into the creative process of The Beatles performances and recording sessions. Whether or not you’re a Beatles fan—and especially if you are—you’ll be astonished The Beatles’ innovations in the studio and have a newfound appreciation for the talents of Lennon, McCartney, Harrison, and Starr.

The Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas is showing this film in its main theater at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Feb. 11, and at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 15. Ticket prices are $8. To learn more, visit http://www.beatleslectures.com/. For more information about other film’s playing at one of the North Bank’s best indie theaters, visit www.camasliberty.com.

Wayne’s World Birthday Bash

If you came of age in the 90s—or even if you were already of age—you will totally remember Wayne’s World, dude. Based on the Saturday Night Live sketch of the same name, the movie Wayne’s World (originally released in 1992) is a wacky, irreverent pop-culture comedy about the adventures of two amiably aimless metal-head friends, Wayne (Mike Myers) and Garth (Dana Carvey). (Oh, for the good ol’ days, when shiftless headbangers were so adorable!)

Anyhow, back to the plot synopsis. From Wayne’s basement, the pair broadcast a talk-show called Wayne’s World, on local public access television. The show comes to the attention of a sleazy network executive (Rob Lowe) who wants to produce a big-budget version of Wayne’s World—and he also wants Wayne’s girlfriend, a rock singer named Cassandra (Tia Carrere). Wayne and Garth have to battle the executive not only to save their show, but also Cassandra.

If, like me, you can’t do math easily in your head, 2017 marks the 25th anniversary of Wayne’s World (a.k.a. WW25), and the North Bank’s two independent theaters, the Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver and the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas, are celebrating with a special “Birthday Bash” extended version of the film, featuring the film’s director and cast members with an introduction by Rolling Stone’s Peter Travers. Stick around after the end credits roll for an on-screen conversation with director Penelope Spheeris, Tia Carrere, Colleen Camp, Robert Patrick, and special presentation with Mike Myers, Dana Carvey, Lorne Michaels and Rob Lowe.

The Kiggins Theatre is showing the Wayne’s World Birthday Bash on Tuesday, Feb. 7, and Wednesday, Feb. 8, and the Liberty Theatre is showing it on Wednesday, Feb. 8. Visit each theater’s website—www.kigginstheatre.net or www.camasliberty.com—for showtimes and ticket pricing.

Oscar-Nominated Short Films

Starting Friday, Feb. 10, the Kiggins Theater in downtown Vancouver and the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas will show all the Oscar-nominated short films, starting with animated shorts, followed by live action films and then moving on to short-subject documentaries.

If you plan on seeing all the films at the Kiggins, save money and purchase an Oscar Shorts punchcard for $30—otherwise, all seats are $9, except Bargain Monday, when tickets are $6. For a complete list of films and showtimes, see the Kiggins website at www.kigginstheatre.net. If you’re going to catch the Oscar Shorts program at the Liberty, tickets are sold at the regular prices: $4.50 before 6 p.m., $5.50 after 6 p.m., and $3.50 for all shows on Mondays and Tuesdays. For more details, visit www.camasliberty.com. For more information about the films to be shown, check out http://shorts.tv/theoscarshorts/. Here are the programs that will be showing at both theaters:

  • ANIMATED SHORTS (running time: 87 minutes; good for kids 8 and up, except for the final film)
    Borrowed Time – USA, 7 minutes
    Pearl – USA, 6 minutes
    Piper – USA, 6 minutes
    Blind Vaysha – Canada, 8 minutes
    The Head Vanishes – 9 minutes
    Asteria  – 5 minutes
    Once Upon a Line – 7 minutes
    Pear Cider and Cigarettes – Canada and UK, 35 minutes (not appropriate for children)
  • LIVE ACTION SHORTS (running time: 134 minutes, suitable for ages 15+)
    Sing – Hungary, 25 minutes
    Silent Nights – Denmark, 30 minutes
    Timecode – Spain, 15 minutes
    Ennemis Interieurs – France, 28 minutes
    La Femme et la TGV – Switzerland, 30 minutes
  • DOCUMENTARY SHORTS, PROGRAM A (running time: 76 minutes, suitable for ages 16+)
    Joe’s Violin – dir. Kahane Cooperman, USA, 24 minutes
    Extremis – dir. Dan Krauss, USA, 24 minutes
    4.1 Miles – dir. Daphne Matziaraki, USA, 22 minutes
  • DOCUMENTARY SHORTS, PROGRAM B (running time: 85 minutes, suitable for ages 16+)
    Watani: My Homeland – UK, 39 minutes
    The White Helmets – USA, 41 minutes

The Sleeping Beauty

Everyone needs a bit of fairytale inspiration now and then…and there’s hardly a tale more beautifully told than “The Sleeping Beauty,” as performed by the Bolshoi Ballet. You can see this richly staged production at the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas at 12:55 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 5, and again at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 8.

The Bolshoi dancers take viewers on a dream-like journey through this beloved story, complete with jewel fairies, a magical kingdom, a youthful princess, and a handsome prince—all in the pure style of classical ballet. The Bolshoi’s sumptuous staging with its luxurious sets and costumes gives imaginative new life to Perrault’s fairytale. The Bolshoi’s young and rising star Olga Smirnova dances the part of Princess Aurora, who falls for Fairy Carabosse’s (danced by Alexei Loparevich) trick and falls into a slumber of 100 years. Semyon Chudin dances the role of Prince Désiré, whose kiss will eventually bring her back to life.

Running time is about two hours and 25 minutes, including intermission. General admission is $15 or $12 for seniors over 60 and children under age 15. The Liberty Theatre is located at 315 N.E. 4th Ave. in downtown Camas. This film is part of Liberty Theatre’s “Event Cinema” series, featuring film-format operas, ballets, musicals, plays, and great orchestral works. To find out more about what’s showing at the Liberty, visit www.camasliberty.com.

Groundhog Day at the Liberty Theatre

Do you ever feel like you’re just living the same day, over and over and over again? Do you find yourself asking, “Is this all there is?” or, “If only Bill Murray were here, my life would be so much funnier, in a slyly droll, understated sort of way.” In Groundhog Day, the 1993 Bill Murray-Andy MacDowell comedy classic, local weatherman Phil Connors (Murray, but of course) gets caught in a time loop while covering the Feb. 2 emergence of the world’s most famous groundhog, Punxutawney Phil (hmmm, the groundhog and the main character have the same name…), an event that, according to folklore, predicts whether there will be a long winter or an early spring.

The time-trapped weatherman at first indulges himself and takes advantage of others by employing his foreknowledge of the day’s events, then grows bored and tries to free himself from the endlessly repeated day, without success. Meanwhile, he tries to pursue an infatuation with his producer, Rita Hanson (MacDowell) but gets nowhere. Eventually he undergoes a sort of metaphysical awakening…but does he get the girl? It’s a film that’s a straight comedy on the surface, but also an exploration of life’s ultimate meaning. What’s not to love?

The film—directed by Harold Ramis of Ghostbusters fame—was added in 2006 to the United States National Film Registry as being deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.” A stage musical version of the film premiered in 2016. Groundhog Day is shown in theaters around the country on Feb. 2—and the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas is where you can get your Groundhog Day fix on the North Bank. It’s showing at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 2, with additional showings on Feb. 3 and 4. For more information about showtimes and ticket pricing, visit www.camasliberty.com.

Waynes’ World Birthday Bash

If you came of age in the 90s—or even if you were already of age—you will totally remember Wayne’s World, dude. Based on the Saturday Night Live sketch of the same name, the movie Wayne’s World (originally released in 1992) is a wacky, irreverent pop-culture comedy about the adventures of two amiably aimless metal-head friends, Wayne (Mike Myers) and Garth (Dana Carvey). (Oh, for the good ol’ days, when shiftless headbangers were so adorable!)

Anyhow, back to the plot synopsis. From Wayne’s basement, the pair broadcast a talk-show called Wayne’s World, on local public access television. The show comes to the attention of a sleazy network executive (Rob Lowe) who wants to produce a big-budget version of Wayne’s World—and he also wants Wayne’s girlfriend, a rock singer named Cassandra (Tia Carrere). Wayne and Garth have to battle the executive not only to save their show, but also Cassandra.

If, like me, you can’t do math easily in your head, 2017 marks the 25th anniversary of Wayne’s World (a.k.a. WW25), and the North Bank’s two independent theaters, the Kiggins Theatre in downtown Vancouver and the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas, are celebrating with a special “Birthday Bash” extended version of the film, featuring the film’s director and cast members with an introduction by Rolling Stone’s Peter Travers. Stick around after the end credits roll for an on-screen conversation with director Penelope Spheeris, Tia Carrere, Colleen Camp, Robert Patrick, and special presentation with Mike Myers, Dana Carvey, Lorne Michaels and Rob Lowe.

The Kiggins Theatre is showing the Wayne’s World Birthday Bash on Tuesday, Feb. 7, and Wednesday, Feb. 8, and the Liberty Theatre is showing it on Wednesday, Feb. 8. Visit each theater’s website—www.kigginstheatre.net or www.camasliberty.com—for showtimes and ticket pricing.

The Sleeping Beauty

Everyone needs a bit of fairytale inspiration now and then…and there’s hardly a tale more beautifully told than “The Sleeping Beauty,” as performed by the Bolshoi Ballet. You can see this richly staged production at the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas at 12:55 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 5, and again at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 8.

The Bolshoi dancers take viewers on a dream-like journey through this beloved story, complete with jewel fairies, a magical kingdom, a youthful princess, and a handsome prince—all in the pure style of classical ballet. The Bolshoi’s sumptuous staging with its luxurious sets and costumes gives imaginative new life to Perrault’s fairytale. The Bolshoi’s young and rising star Olga Smirnova dances the part of Princess Aurora, who falls for Fairy Carabosse’s (danced by Alexei Loparevich) trick and falls into a slumber of 100 years. Semyon Chudin dances the role of Prince Désiré, whose kiss will eventually bring her back to life.

Running time is about two hours and 25 minutes, including intermission. General admission is $15 or $12 for seniors over 60 and children under age 15. The Liberty Theatre is located at 315 N.E. 4th Ave. in downtown Camas. This film is part of Liberty Theatre’s “Event Cinema” series, featuring film-format operas, ballets, musicals, plays, and great orchestral works. To find out more about what’s showing at the Liberty, visit www.camasliberty.com.

The C Word: An Unusual Documentary About Cancer

The independent Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas is offering a special showing of “The C Word,” produced by Morgan Freeman and directed by Meghan O’Hara. This is a documentary about cancer—but it’s not just a documentary, and it’s certainly not your average, depressing, just-the-facts-m’am recitation of dry statistics and numbers. Instead, The C Word humorously aims its lens at the multi-level, systematic failings of our society: habits that predispose us to disease, Western medicine’s fixation on treatment instead of addressing the root causes, and the giant medical-industrial-pharmaceutical machine that seeks to guard the status quo. Mainstream responses to a diagnosis of cancer are fueled by good intentions and lots of money, and is mainly resistant to change because there is, indeed, lots of money to be made off this devastating disease.

The film—which has already won more awards than you can shake an IV line at—goes on to present a jaunty indictment (thanks to Morgan Freeman’s engaging, lighthearted narration) of the trillion-dollar processed food industry that thrives while we get sick, leaving us overweight but undernourished. The film is an opening volley in a new conversation about how we can—not to mince words, and quoting the film’s promotional material—”kick cancer’s ass.”

This film was originally scheduled to be shown on Jan. 11, but the showing had to be canceled due to Snowpocalypse. The Liberty Theatre has rescheduled this one-time-only showing to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 1. All seats are $8. For more details or to buy your tickets in advance, visit www.camasliberty.com.

Groundhog Day at Liberty

Do you ever feel like you’re just living the same day, over and over and over again? Do you find yourself asking, “Is this all there is?” or, “If only Bill Murray were here, my life would be so much funnier, in a slyly droll, understated sort of way.” In Groundhog Day, the 1993 Bill Murray-Andie MacDowell comedy classic, local weatherman Phil Connors (Murray, but of course) gets caught in a time loop while covering the Feb. 2 emergence of the world’s most famous groundhog, Punxutawney Phil (hmmm, the groundhog and the main character have the same name…), an event that, according to folklore, predicts whether there will be a long winter or an early spring.

The time-trapped weatherman at first indulges himself and takes advantage of others by employing his foreknowledge of the day’s events, then grows bored and tries to free himself from the endlessly repeated day, without success. Meanwhile, he tries to pursue an infatuation with his producer, Rita Hanson (MacDowell) but gets nowhere. Eventually he undergoes a sort of metaphysical awakening…but does he get the girl? It’s a film that’s a straight comedy on the surface, but also an exploration of life’s ultimate meaning. What’s not to love?

The film—directed by Harold Ramis of Ghostbusters fame—was added in 2006 to the United States National Film Registry as being deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.” A stage musical version of the film premiered in 2016. Groundhog Day is shown in theaters around the country on Feb. 2—and the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas is where you can get your Groundhog Day fix on the North Bank. It’s showing at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 2, with additional showings on Feb. 3 and 4. For more information about showtimes and ticket pricing, visit www.camasliberty.com.

The C Word: An Unusual Documentary About Cancer

The independent Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas is offering a special showing of “The C Word,” produced by Morgan Freeman and directed by Meghan O’Hara. This is a documentary about cancer—but it’s not just a documentary, and it’s certainly not your average, depressing, just-the-facts-m’am recitation of dry statistics and numbers. Instead, The C Word humorously aims its lens at the multi-level, systematic failings of our society: habits that predispose us to disease, Western medicine’s fixation on treatment instead of addressing the root causes, and the giant medical-industrial-pharmaceutical machine that seeks to guard the status quo. Mainstream responses to a diagnosis of cancer are fueled by good intentions and lots of money, and is mainly resistant to change because there is, indeed, lots of money to be made off this devastating disease.

The film—which has already won more awards than you can shake an IV line at—goes on to present a jaunty indictment (thanks to Morgan Freeman’s engaging, lighthearted narration) of the trillion-dollar processed food industry that thrives while we get sick, leaving us overweight but undernourished. The film is an opening volley in a new conversation about how we can—not to mince words, and quoting the film’s promotional material—”kick cancer’s ass.”

This film was originally scheduled to be shown on Jan. 11, but the showing had to be canceled due to Snowpocalypse. The Liberty Theatre has rescheduled this one-time-only showing to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 1. All seats are $8. For more details or to buy your tickets in advance, visit www.camasliberty.com.

Antarctica: Ice and Sky

iceandskyantarcticaIf the melting icecaps keep you up at night, Antarctica: Ice and Sky may not ease your insomniac musings. If the melting icecaps DON’T keep you up at night, this film may cause you to join your sleepless acquaintances. Either way, you’ll be rewarded with breathtaking, awe-inspiring scenery, fantastical landscapes, clarion colors, majestic wildlife especially suited to its icy environment, and thought-provoking narration that carries the emotional weight of a filmmaker who passionately loves his subject.

This documentary, directed by Oscar®-winning director Luc Jacquet, offers a a stirring portrait of French glaciologist, Claude Lorius, whose groundbreaking research in Antarctica gave us the first clear evidence of man-made global climate change. Lorius discovered his destiny as a college student when he joined an expedition to Antarctica in 1955; land essentially untouched by scientific experiment. He would go on to participate in twenty-two expeditions during his long career, facing unforgiving conditions and brutal personal challenges that were rewarded with an amazing discovery: using ice cores thousands of meters deep, tiny air bubbles suspended in the ice reveal the composition of the planet’s atmosphere over nearly a million years.

The Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas is showing Antarctica: Ice and Sky—unrated, with a running time of one hour and 29 minutes—a half dozen times, starting at 5:25 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 27, and showing daily for a week (except for Tuesday, Jan. 31). Tickets are $4.50 to $5.50, except on bargain days, when they are $3.50. To purchase your tickets in advance and choose your seats, click here. For more information about other films and showtimes at Liberty, visit www.camasliberty.com.

The C Word: An Unusual Documentary About Cancer

The independent Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas is offering a one-time showing of “The C Word,” produced by Morgan Freeman and directed by Meghan O’Hara. This is a documentary about cancer—but it’s not just a documentary, and it’s certainly not your average, depressing, just-the-facts-m’am recitation of dry statistics and numbers. Instead, The C Word humorously aims its lens at the multi-level, systematic failings of our society: habits that predispose us to disease, Western medicine’s fixation on treatment instead of addressing the root causes, and the giant medical-industrial-pharmaceutical machine that seeks to guard the status quo. Mainstream responses to a diagnosis of cancer are fueled by good intentions and lots of money, and is mainly resistant to change because there is, indeed, lots of money to be made off this devastating disease.

The film—which has already won more awards than you can shake an IV line at—goes on to present a jaunty indictment (thanks to Morgan Freeman’s engaging, lighthearted narration) of the trillion-dollar processed food industry that thrives while we get sick, leaving us overweight but undernourished. The film is an opening volley in a new conversation about how we can—not to mince words, and quoting the film’s promotional material—”kick cancer’s ass.”

The Liberty Theatre will show The C Word at 7:40 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 11. All seats are $8. For more details or to buy your tickets in advance, visit www.camasliberty.com.

The C Word: An Unusual Documentary About Cancer

The independent Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas is offering a one-time showing of “The C Word,” produced by Morgan Freeman and directed by Meghan O’Hara. This is a documentary about cancer—but it’s not just a documentary, and it’s certainly not your average, depressing, just-the-facts-m’am recitation of dry statistics and numbers. Instead, The C Word humorously aims its lens at the multi-level, systematic failings of our society: habits that predispose us to disease, Western medicine’s fixation on treatment instead of addressing the root causes, and the giant medical-industrial-pharmaceutical machine that seeks to guard the status quo. Mainstream responses to a diagnosis of cancer are fueled by good intentions and lots of money, and is mainly resistant to change because there is, indeed, lots of money to be made off this devastating disease.

The film—which has already won more awards than you can shake an IV line at—goes on to present a jaunty indictment (thanks to Morgan Freeman’s engaging, lighthearted narration) of the trillion-dollar processed food industry that thrives while we get sick, leaving us overweight but undernourished. The film is an opening volley in a new conversation about how we can—not to mince words, and quoting the film’s promotional material—”kick cancer’s ass.”

The Liberty Theatre will show The C Word at 7:40 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 11. All seats are $8. For more details or to buy your tickets in advance, visit www.camasliberty.com.

 

Patrick Steward, Ian McKellan in No Man’s Land

I don’t know about you, but I’ll watch Sir Patrick Stewart (Captain Picard, Professor Charles Xavier, Scrooge) and Sir Ian McKellan (Gandalf, Richard III, Death) in just about anything. What a treat to see them together in the National Theatre Live’s production of No Man’s Land, a play written by Harold Pinter. This specially-formatted-for-cinema staging of Pinter’s masterpiece can be seen at the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 4, and Saturday, Jan. 7. Here’s a plot teaser (no spoilers, I promise):

One summer’s evening, two ageing writers, known only as Hirst and Spooner (McKellen and Stewart, respectively), meet in a Hampstead pub and continue their drinking into the night at Hirst’s stately house nearby. As the pair become increasingly inebriated, and their stories increasingly unbelievable, the lively conversation soon turns into a revealing power game, further complicated by the return home of two sinister younger men, Foster and Briggs. It gradually becomes apparent that Foster is Hirst’s apprentice and housekeeper, and Briggs is Hirst’s personal servant. All exit except for Spooner and Foster, the latter of whom creepily says, “You know what it’s like when you’re in a room with the light on and then suddenly the light goes out? I’ll show you. It’s like this.” He flicks off the lights, causing a blackout. WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? Only Captain Picard and Gandalf can say.

The play will be shown in Liberty’s Main Theatre, and is not appropriate for children under seven, who couldn’t sit still for the play’s two-and-a-half-hour running time, anyhow. General admission is $18.50 or $15 for students and seniors. For more details, visit www.camasliberty.com.

Ian McKellan, Patrick Stewart in No Man’s Land

I don’t know about you, but I’ll watch Sir Patrick Stewart (Captain Picard, Professor Charles Xavier, Scrooge) and Sir Ian McKellan (Gandalf, Richard III, Death) in just about anything. What a treat to see them together in the National Theatre Live’s production of No Man’s Land, a play written by Harold Pinter. This specially-formatted-for-cinema staging of Pinter’s masterpiece can be seen at the Liberty Theatre in downtown Camas at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 4, and Saturday, Jan. 7. Here’s a plot teaser (no spoilers, I promise):

One summer’s evening, two ageing writers, known only as Hirst and Spooner (McKellen and Stewart, respectively), meet in a Hampstead pub and continue their drinking into the night at Hirst’s stately house nearby. As the pair become increasingly inebriated, and their stories increasingly unbelievable, the lively conversation soon turns into a revealing power game, further complicated by the return home of two sinister younger men, Foster and Briggs. It gradually becomes apparent that Foster is Hirst’s apprentice and housekeeper, and Briggs is Hirst’s personal servant. All exit except for Spooner and Foster, the latter of whom creepily says, “You know what it’s like when you’re in a room with the light on and then suddenly the light goes out? I’ll show you. It’s like this.” He flicks off the lights, causing a blackout. WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? Only Captain Picard and Gandalf can say.

The play will be shown in Liberty’s Main Theatre, and is not appropriate for children under seven, who couldn’t sit still for the play’s two-and-a-half-hour running time, anyhow. General admission is $18.50 or $15 for students and seniors. For more details, visit www.camasliberty.com.