hiking

Don’t miss out on Lake Merwin

What is so special about Lake Merwin? My friends and I all love to take our kids there. Though most of my friends are bringing their families from nearby Woodland, Yacolt and La Center, I relish the occasional trek from downtown Vancouver to clear my head and let my kids run and play in the crystal clear lake.

Lake Merwin is a reservoir on the East Fork of the Lewis River. The lake is cool and clear even on the most scorching of summer days Vancouver seems to be suffering lately, and worth paying a visit in the cool days as well.

Merwin Park, at the west end of the Merwin reservoir, is open year round for swimming, boarding, fishing and general hanging about. The park can accommodate big groups of people, with 250 parking spots and 135 picnic tables. Merwin Park is especially family friendly, with a playground, clean and spacious restrooms, and hiking trails. Speelyai Bay Park at the east end is also open for day use year round. Smaller but equally as beautiful as Merwin Park, Speelyai offers a busy two-lane boat ramp, another 250 parking spots, but only 25 picnic tables.

Cresap Bay campground, east of Speelyai Bay Park, is open the Friday before Memorial Day and closed September 30. So consider making campsite reservations now for the busy time. Reservations can be made up to nine months in advance, and considering the increasing pull of the East Fork, it’s a good idea to be planning ahead. Cresap Bay Campground has a swimming beach, 56 overnight campsites and a group camping facility with 15 sites, a covered shelter and a fireplace. A two-lane boat ramp and 23-slip marina are available to overnight guests.

While you won’t be able to camp at Lake Merwin yet, take a day trip to two to this spectacular portion of the Upper Lewis River during one of our many beautiful spring days.

photo by evans burik

RISING FROM THE ASHES

Columbia Gorge fires are sparking opportunities for progress on the North Bank.

There are many organizations in the Columbia River Gorge looking out for the the health of its environment, the lives of its people and the prosperity of its businesses. After a monumental event like the recent Columbia Gorge fires that engulfed the Eagle Creek Wilderness area in Oregon and jumped the Columbia River to burns parts of Skamania County last fall, impacts will be felt far and wide for months and years to come. A silver lining is that some of those impacts may actually benefit Southwest Washington.

These fires are a pivotal moment for the Gorge, which tends to be overrun with day-use congestion on the Oregon side in the summer. But Gorge Towns to Trails, launched by Friends of the Columbia Gorge, is poised to move forward on a multi-year vision for trekking on the Washington side. Renee Tkach is the project manager for Gorge Towns to Trails, an effort to make 200 miles of connected trails in the Columbia River Gorge that bridge Gorge communities on both sides, which are between five and 15 miles apart. The project is nearly seven years in the making.

After the fire: Connecting towns with trails

Tkach describes Gorge Towns to Trails as a “European-style hiking system” connected by shuttles, and sprinkled with lodges and B&Bs. The vision is to transform the Columbia River Gorge from a congested day-use area into a destination for extended multi-day vacations that lead hikers into the communities of the Columbia River Gorge, where they can enjoy the many home grown products like fruit, wine, beer, textiles, fish and so forth, boosting local businesses.

Currently, Gorge Towns to Trails is primarily focused on the North Bank.

Tkach stressed the optimal position of Washougal as the gateway to the Gorge. There is an opportunity for a 34-mile trail connecting Steigerwald National Wildlife Refuge, Cape Horn, Beacon Rock State Park and the Pacific Crest Trail as well as the communities of Washougal, North Bonneville, Stevenson and Cascade Locks. Right now the group is working to connect the remaining 2.5 miles of trail corridor needed for the Washougal to Stevenson trail section, and they have partnered with Port of Camas-Washougal to develop a new, one-mile trail that will serve as the west entrance for Gorge Towns to Trails. In addition, there is a planned expansion and restoration of Steigerwald Refuge, while connecting it to new trail moving east.

Further north, there are plans to connect the urban area of Lyle to the top of the 550-acre Lyle Cherry Orchard property owned by Friends of the Columbia Gorge Land Trust.

“Vancouver and especially Camas and Washougal have really elevated their role in how they interact with this future trail vision. Now Washougal is funding the final connection, the Lewis and Clark Trail. It will be the gateway to Gorge Towns and Trails, setting the pace for the rest of the Gorge community,” Tkach said. “Camas and Washougal are incorporating it into their identity, and now Camas it calling itself a trailhead and developing signage.”

Friends of the Columbia Gorge launched Gorge Towns to Trails in 2011, in celebration of the National Scenic Area’s 30th anniversary and 40,000 acres of new public lands that came into place during that time. And much of the messaging was focused on clearing some of the congestion that had come into the Gorge. The group was exploring ways to disperse people’s usage. “How can we accommodate all these people coming for year round hiking, and the growth in population? The ‘walls and falls’ area had become so congested, it was Disneyland of the Gorge during the summer months,” said Tkach.

The group was already strategizing ways to motivate hikers and visitors to explore east Gorge gems like Stevenson, White Salmon and North Bonneville, when the fires began to rage through the Eagle Creek Wilderness.

Friends of the Columbia Gorge is in the middle of its Preserve the Wonder campaign, which aims to acquire and protect seven unique properties totaling more than 400 acres along the Washington side of the Columbia River Gorge. The centerpiece of that campaign is Steigerwald Shores, a 160-acre riverfront property adjacent to Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge.

“With the fire happening on the Oregon side, we have this prime moment in time,” said Tkach. “How do we hit the pause button in this area and develop these other trails as well as let this fire area recover naturally?” The US Forest Service, which is the Friends of the Columbia Gorge’s land manager, is not going to replant at this time, but rather let nature take its course according to Tkach. The famous Angel’s Rest was the hottest area, and the hardest hit, but many were relieved to see that the Gorge wasn’t a barren wasteland as the fires settled down. “It’s a mosaic burn,” said Tkach, “something ideal for the forest, actually.”

Rachel Pawlitz, a public affairs officer with the National Scenic Area, agreed with dispersing tourists and hikers throughout the Gorge, but cautioned that there is crowding on the Washington side as well, especially in places like the popular climb nine miles east of Carson, Dog Mountain. She said the Forest Service hasn’t “settled in our approach” to prevent crowding, environmental impact, parking and associated issues.

As land managers, it’s the Forest Service’s credo to help visitors “leave no trace” and to prevent people having to call search and rescue. Safety and environmental impact are paramount.

Showing the Gorge some love

In the meantime, the Columbia Gorge Tourism Alliance started a campaign called Show the Gorge Some Love, a month long push in October to bring visitors to the Gorge with special events, sales and targeting marketing of the 18 communities on both side of the river. Similarly, the “Kick Ash” Campaign was spearheaded by the Portland Business Alliance and encouraged Portlanders to head to the Gorge.

Even in Vancouver, unlikely alliances were being formed to support tree planting and the environment in the wake of the fires, including Sky Zone and Friends of Trees.

“In the wake of the Eagle Creek fire, Sky Zone Vancouver approached us with a dodgeball tournament fundraiser for Friends of Trees,” said Sam Erman, Friends of Trees Corporate and Business Relations Specialist. “They expressed their desire to volunteer with an organization in the Gorge once they had the opportunity but wanted to take immediate action for the environment. We partner with businesses in a lot of ways and are thrilled to be working with the business community in Southwest Washington.”

Jill Burnette helms the Columbia Gorge Community Foundation. They are not directly involved with relief or restoration efforts, but rather their role during the fire was to “help disseminate information,” to provide a clearinghouse of resources that were providing relief and services during the fires.

One of the unique things about the CGCF is that is serves both sides of the river, with board members representing every county in the Gorge, including Skamania and Klickitat County in Washington.

Burnette reflected that the fire and relief efforts were well under control, and she had heard a huge amount of gratitude from community members. “The workers were really efficient. They had never met each other and certainly had never worked together before. The entire effort was incredibly well managed.”

Because CGCF is a community foundation it simply manages permanent endowments. But they do an annual grant-making program, where area organizations apply for funding. “We may see fire and restoration in the next grant making cycle. And twice a year, our donor advised funds generally choose to make grants. Any of those fundholders may elect to support a group who is involved in fire support and restoration,” said Burnette.

The Archer Mountain Fire in Skamania County started on Sept. 5 from embers blowing over the river from the Eagle Creek Fire, which had ignited several days prior. A 15-year-old Vancouver boy has since been charged with reckless burning and other allegations. The Archer Mountain Fire burned 240 acres, and was contained by mid-September, while across the river, the Eagle Creek Fire is still considered active. It has burned nearly 50,000 acres and is considered 50 percent contained as of Nov. 9.

“The Gorge is a resilient place,” said Tkach, who lives in Skamania County just a mile from the north side fires. “It’s still there, it’s still beautiful.”

Story by Jessica Swanson
Photo by Mitch Hammontree

30 Great Hikes from Here to the Coast with Author James D. Thayer

On Saturday, May 6, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center, author James D. Thayer will discuss his recent book, “Hiking from Portland to the Coast: An Interpretive Guide to 30 Trails.” This event is presented by the Friends of Fort Vancouver, in partnership with Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

Thayer is a Portland-based author who is also a faculty member at Portland State University. “Hiking from Portland to the Coast” is an authoritative guide to Pacific Northwest trails narrated with interpretive stories about the intriguing places those hikes lead.

At this free event, Thayer will deliver a presentation on his work, then will sign copies of his book, which will be available for sale in the Friends of Fort Vancouver Bookstore. The Fort Vancouver Visitor Center is located at 1501 E. Evergreen Blvd. in Vancouver.

Hiking from Here to the Coast with Author James Thayer

On Saturday, May 6, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center, author James D. Thayer will discuss his recent book, “Hiking from Portland to the Coast: An Interpretive Guide to 30 Trails.” This event is presented by the Friends of Fort Vancouver, in partnership with Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

Thayer is a Portland-based author who is also a faculty member at Portland State University. “Hiking from Portland to the Coast” is an authoritative guide to Pacific Northwest trails narrated with interpretive stories about the intriguing places those hikes lead.

At this free event, Thayer will deliver a presentation on his work, then will sign copies of his book, which will be available for sale in the Friends of Fort Vancouver Bookstore. The Fort Vancouver Visitor Center is located at 1501 E. Evergreen Blvd. in Vancouver.

St. Helens Climber’s Bivouac Now Open

Climbers, gear up: Forest Road 81-830 to Climber's Bivouac is now open for the remainder of the 2014 Mount St. Helens summer climbing season. The primary trailhead for Mount St. Helens climbers will now begin at Climbers Bivouac. Use caution when driving along the road; crews are currently grading the road and repairing the guardrail, and work of this sort will be happening through June.

It may be spring down here at lower elevations, but there's still snow up on the mountain, and climbers are advised to stay back 10-15 feet from the cornices (overhanging snow) at the crater rim. More important details to note before you plan your climb: Ptarmigan Trail is covered with patchy snow, so Mount St. Helens climbing rangers recommend bringing an ice axe and crampons. Micro spikes and snowshoes are also useful for traction in snow.

To access Climber's Bivouac, head east along Forest Road 90 from Cougar, turn left on Forest Road 83 and left again on Forest Road 81, and then make a right turn on the Forest Road 81-830 to Climber's Bivouac. For more information, contact the Mount St. Helens Institute at 360-449-7883 or info@mshinstitute.org.

Get Outdoors, North Bank-style

Although some of you broke out the camping gear the moment the temperature rose above 50 degrees, for most Southwest Washingtonians, Memorial Day weekend marks the traditional start of the outdoor recreation season. Fortunately, the Gifford Pinchot National Forest gives us so much to choose from: 40 campgrounds, 102 trailheads, nine horse camps, and 17 picnic and boating areas—just for starters. In addition to the traditional campgrounds and trailheads, the Gifford Pinchot National Forest also has Johnston Ridge Observatory on the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument for you to explore.

Some campgrounds require reservations  (go to www.reserveamerica.com) and some trails require a pass to help us keep them maintained (see Recreation Passes and Permits)—but every acres of National Forest lands belong to you and beckon you to come visit. Unlike some public lands, you can camp nearly anywhere in your national forests. There are three fee-free days and a fee-free weekend left this year, with two coming up in June. Here they are:

For more information about having fun in your local national forests, visit Discover Your Northwest. For information about the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, visit www.fs.usda.gov/giffordpinchot.

Snowshoe Adventure

Snowshoe Adventures allow participants to explore some of the most breathtaking scenery in the state, including Elk Rock, Old Man Pass, Ape Caves, and June Lake. Hikes are guided by outdoor specialists from the Mount St. Helens Institute.

Participants can bring their own snowshoes or rent a pair (with trekking poles) for $15. Hiking routes are moderately difficult, and hikers need to come prepared with proper gear and water. The Snowshoe Adventures are quite popular, and some hikes sell out in advance, so early registration is suggested. Please note: the $30 registration fee is non-refundable.

Snowshoe Adventures will be held on Feb. 15, 22, March 1 and 8.

Sign up and get specific information on times and directions at www.mshinstitute.org.