Fort Vancouver

Lantern Tours of Fort Vancouver & the Barracks

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site is pleased to announce this season’s dates for our annual Lantern Tours at the national park. The Lantern Tour Series offers attendees an opportunity to view many of the resources of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site in a different light—at night, on foot, and by candle lantern! Reservations for all Lantern Tours are required, and payment for the tour must be made at the time of the reservation. The Lantern Tour season runs from October through February each year. Lantern Tour reservations for the upcoming seasons are being accepted now. This season, the park is offering two different types of Lantern Tours: one which explores the reconstructed 19th century Hudson’s Bay Company Fort Vancouver, and another of the U.S. Army’s Vancouver Barracks. Both Lantern Tours meet at the entrance gate to the reconstructed Fort Vancouver, 1001 E. 5th St. All tours start at 7 p.m. Due to program length, these tours are recommended for children ages 10 and over. Reservations are $20 for adults and $10 for children ages 15 and under. To make reservations, call the bookstore at the park’s Visitor Center at 360-816-6216.

Lantern Tour: An Evening at the Fort is a wonderful opportunity to experience the reconstructed Hudson’s Bay Company fort at night. As in past years, each adult attending the program will carry their own candle lantern and tour with a park ranger through the reconstructed fort’s Counting House, Fur Store, Chief Factor’s House, Kitchen, and Bake House. In each building, visitors will experience historical vignettes with costumed living history interpreters, including graduates of the park’s Youth Volunteer Programs. Visitors will learn what activities would have occurred during the evening hours at Fort Vancouver. Tours will be offered on the following dates:

  • Oct. 28, 2017
  • Nov. 25, 2017
  • Dec. 16, 2017
  • Jan. 27, 2018
  • Feb. 17, 2018

Lantern Tour: Walking Vancouver Barracks will take visitors through the grounds of Vancouver Barracks by lantern light, connecting attendees to the national park’s military history through thematic storytelling. These tours will be small in size, and each will feature a specific thematic focus rather than historical vignettes. They will require walking through grass and uneven surfaces at night and in inclement weather, including rain and mud, and therefore, this tour is recommended for visitors with out mobility restrictions. Tours will be offered on the following dates:

  • Oct. 21, 2017
  • Nov. 18, 2017
  • Jan. 20, 2018
  • Feb. 3, 2018

Veterans’ Day Presentation at Fort Vancouver Visitor Center: Pacific War Memories

In honor of Veterans Day, the Friends of Fort Vancouver are hosting a discussion and book signing by Clyde Holloway, son of Stanley P. Holloway, who served as a marine in the Pacific Islands during four years of World War II. Holloway’s unit was the “Forgotten Battalion,” involved with the battles of Tulagi, Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Saipan, Guam, and Iwo Jima. Holloway will be at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 11, to read from his book, “Pacific War Marine,” which chronicles the wartime experiences of hi father.

Stanley P. Holloway didn’t say anything about the war for fifty years. Then his son started asking him questions. What followed was an outpouring of stories that spanned four years, including numerous island invasions. Holloway braved machine gun fire while Marines died around him, watched a banzai attack, survived mortar barrages and Howitzer attacks, contracted life-threatening diseases…and met the love of his life. Stanley P. Holloway’s story of survival entails not only fighting, but also dealing with the inanities of the Marine Corps, developing a deep brotherhood with fellow Marines, and coping with the death and loss that war inevitably brings.

The Visitor Center, located at 1501 E. Evergreen Blvd. in Vancouver, is part of the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. Ample free parking is available on site. The event is free and open to the public and no RSVP is necessary. Copies of the book will be available to purchase and be signed by Holloway. The event follows the annual Veterans’ Day Parade.

Veterans’ Day Ceremony & Parade

The Historic Trust invites you to mark Veterans’ Day with the 31st annual Veterans’ Day Ceremony and Parade on Saturday, Nov. 11. The parade will be preceded by the Veteran’s Day Ceremony at 10 a.m. in the Providence Academy Ballroom, 400 E. Evergreen Blvd, presented with support from the Community Military Appreciation Committee and Columbia Credit Union. The ceremony will feature Reviewing Officer, Colonel Pirak, as the keynote speaker. Local veterans will be recognized, and the 2017 Grand Marshals of the parade, Commander Yvette Brown-Wahler and Ryan Corcilius, will be honored for their service to our community and our country. Attendees may view the parade after the ceremony from limited covered seating on the Academy lawn.

The parade begins at 11 a.m. This year marks the 31st anniversary of the community celebration honoring veterans of all service branches. This is a free, community event that is open to the public. View the 2017 lineup here.

The parade route begins on the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site at Evergreen Blvd. and E. Reserve St. The parade heads west along Evergreen Blvd., past Officers Row and the Providence Academy. At the Vancouver Community Library, the parade will head south down C St. and turn west on 8th St. From 8th, the parade will turn north on Main St., and head east on 11th St., ending back at the Providence Academy. Attendees are welcome to watch the parade from the sidewalks, grass, and covered areas along the parade route.

Land of Milk and Honey: Illuminated Slides Show Our Region’s Food History

Join the Oregon Historical Society and the National Park Service at Fort Vancouver for a unique look at our past: a pictorial history of food in the Northwest from 1850-1940, with an emphasis on the agricultural bounty that makes it one of the best places to eat in the world. Culinary historian Heather Arndt Anderson (author of Portland: A Food Biography) and Oregon Historical Society archivist Matthew Cowan will present a collection of historic glass lantern slides—hand-colored and projected using an original 1930s projector—depicting the region’s cornucopia and the stories behind them. The presentation will be held at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center, 1501 E. Evergreen Blvd. in Vancouver, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 8. The event is free and open to everyone.

The lantern slide had its origins in 17th century optical devices, which came to be known as “magic lanterns.” The earliest slides were hand-painted images on glass. By 1850, slides were beginning to be reproduced from negatives and sold commercially, mostly black and white images that were then hand-colored. Do-it-yourself kits were also sold, and amateur photographers, museum, and universities often created their own lantern slides for entertainment or education. Photographic type lantern slides reached the peak of their popularity in the first third of the 20th century. The Oregon Historical Society curates a large collection of lantern slides, documenting many aspects of the early history of the state.

“There is a beauty and depth to hand-colored lantern slides,” says Curator Theresa Langford. “This is a unique opportunity for the public to see original glass slides projected on historic equipment, as Heather and Matthew chronicle the history around the images.”

Land of Milk & Honey: Illuminated Slide Program at Fort Vancouver

Join the Oregon Historical Society and the National Park Service at Fort Vancouver for a unique look at our past: a pictorial history of food in the Northwest from 1850-1940, with an emphasis on the agricultural bounty that makes it one of the best places to eat in the world. Culinary historian Heather Arndt Anderson (author of Portland: A Food Biography) and Oregon Historical Society archivist Matthew Cowan will present a collection of historic glass lantern slides—hand-colored and projected using an original 1930s projector—depicting the region’s cornucopia and the stories behind them. The presentation will be held at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center, 1501 E. Evergreen Blvd. in Vancouver, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 8. The event is free and open to everyone.

The lantern slide had its origins in 17th century optical devices, which came to be known as “magic lanterns.” The earliest slides were hand-painted images on glass. By 1850, slides were beginning to be reproduced from negatives and sold commercially, mostly black and white images that were then hand-colored. Do-it-yourself kits were also sold, and amateur photographers, museum, and universities often created their own lantern slides for entertainment or education. Photographic type lantern slides reached the peak of their popularity in the first third of the 20th century. The Oregon Historical Society curates a large collection of lantern slides, documenting many aspects of the early history of the state.

“There is a beauty and depth to hand-colored lantern slides,” says Curator Theresa Langford. “This is a unique opportunity for the public to see original glass slides projected on historic equipment, as Heather and Matthew chronicle the history around the images.”

Lantern Tours of Fort Vancouver & the Barracks

Fort Vancouver National Historic Site is pleased to announce this season’s dates for our annual Lantern Tours at the national park. The Lantern Tour Series offers attendees an opportunity to view many of the resources of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site in a different light—at night, on foot, and by candle lantern! Reservations for all Lantern Tours are required, and payment for the tour must be made at the time of the reservation. The Lantern Tour season runs from October through February each year. Lantern Tour reservations for the upcoming seasons are being accepted now. This season, the park is offering two different types of Lantern Tours: one which explores the reconstructed 19th century Hudson’s Bay Company Fort Vancouver, and another of the U.S. Army’s Vancouver Barracks. Both Lantern Tours meet at the entrance gate to the reconstructed Fort Vancouver, 1001 E. 5th St. All tours start at 7 p.m. Due to program length, these tours are recommended for children ages 10 and over. Reservations are $20 for adults and $10 for children ages 15 and under. To make reservations, call the bookstore at the park’s Visitor Center at 360-816-6216.

Lantern Tour: An Evening at the Fort is a wonderful opportunity to experience the reconstructed Hudson’s Bay Company fort at night. As in past years, each adult attending the program will carry their own candle lantern and tour with a park ranger through the reconstructed fort’s Counting House, Fur Store, Chief Factor’s House, Kitchen, and Bake House. In each building, visitors will experience historical vignettes with costumed living history interpreters, including graduates of the park’s Youth Volunteer Programs. Visitors will learn what activities would have occurred during the evening hours at Fort Vancouver. Tours will be offered on the following dates:

  • Oct. 28, 2017
  • Nov. 25, 2017
  • Dec. 16, 2017
  • Jan. 27, 2018
  • Feb. 17, 2018

Lantern Tour: Walking Vancouver Barracks will take visitors through the grounds of Vancouver Barracks by lantern light, connecting attendees to the national park’s military history through thematic storytelling. These tours will be small in size, and each will feature a specific thematic focus rather than historical vignettes. They will require walking through grass and uneven surfaces at night and in inclement weather, including rain and mud, and therefore, this tour is recommended for visitors with out mobility restrictions. Tours will be offered on the following dates:

  • Oct. 21, 2017
  • Nov. 18, 2017
  • Jan. 20, 2018
  • Feb. 3, 2018

Old Apple Tree Festival & Cider Tasting

The Old Apple Tree Festival is adding a hard cider tent this year at the celebration of this 191-year-old apple tree! Join the celebration, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 7, at the Old Apple Tree Park, 112 S.E. Columbia Way, directly east of the I-5 Bridge and south of Hwy. 14, within the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

Throughout the day at this free, family-friendly event, enjoy live music, tours of the Land Bridge, art and crafts for kids, tree care workshops, and food available for purchase.  The Urban Forestry Commission will give away a limited number of tree cuttings from the Old Apple Tree. Bring your own clean apples and containers to participate in the free apple pressing, a popular feature of the community festival.

New this year is a 21-and-over, hard cider garden, hosted by Slow Food Southwest Washington. The cider garden features are Tooley Bender from Battle Ground, English Estates from Vancouver, Jester & Judge from Stevenson, and Moulton Falls from Yacolt. Hard ciders will be available to sample or drink by the glass, for a small fee. Limited edition Old Apple Tree Festival 32-ounce growlers will also be available to purchase and take home. Visit www.slowfoodswwa.com for more information.

Planted in 1826 at Fort Vancouver, Vancouver’s venerable Old Apple Tree is the oldest apple tree in the Northwest and considered the matriarch of Washington State’s apple industry. Despite floods, winds, drought, ice and snow, the tree has survived and continues to produce some fruit. The Old Apple Tree Festival is presented by the Urban Forestry Commission, Bartlett Tree Care, Slow Food Southwest Washington, and the National Park Service at Fort Vancouver. For more information about the Old Apple Tree Festival and Vancouver’s efforts to enhance the community’s beautiful and beneficial trees, call Urban Forestry at 360-487-8308 or visit www.cityofvancouver.us/urbanforestry.

Old Apple Tree Festival & Cider Tasting

The Old Apple Tree Festival is adding a hard cider tent this year at the celebration of this 191-year-old apple tree! Join the celebration, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 7, at the Old Apple Tree Park, 112 S.E. Columbia Way, directly east of the I-5 Bridge and south of Hwy. 14, within the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

Throughout the day at this free, family-friendly event, enjoy live music, tours of the Land Bridge, art and crafts for kids, tree care workshops, and food available for purchase.  The Urban Forestry Commission will give away a limited number of tree cuttings from the Old Apple Tree. Bring your own clean apples and containers to participate in the free apple pressing, a popular feature of the community festival.

New this year is a 21-and-over, hard cider garden, hosted by Slow Food Southwest Washington. The cider garden features are Tooley Bender from Battle Ground, English Estates from Vancouver, Jester & Judge from Stevenson, and Moulton Falls from Yacolt. Hard ciders will be available to sample or drink by the glass, for a small fee. Limited edition Old Apple Tree Festival 32-ounce growlers will also be available to purchase and take home. Visit www.slowfoodswwa.com for more information.

Planted in 1826 at Fort Vancouver, Vancouver’s venerable Old Apple Tree is the oldest apple tree in the Northwest and considered the matriarch of Washington State’s apple industry. Despite floods, winds, drought, ice and snow, the tree has survived and continues to produce some fruit. The Old Apple Tree Festival is presented by the Urban Forestry Commission, Bartlett Tree Care, Slow Food Southwest Washington, and the National Park Service at Fort Vancouver. For more information about the Old Apple Tree Festival and Vancouver’s efforts to enhance the community’s beautiful and beneficial trees, call Urban Forestry at 360-487-8308 or visit www.cityofvancouver.us/urbanforestry.

Summer’s End Promenade on Officer’s Row & at The Grant House

The National Park Service at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site will present the annual Summer’s End Promenade on Saturday, Sept. 30, between 1 and 3 p.m., as part of the national park’s celebration of National Public Lands Day—which includes free entrance to the reconstructed fort, all day long! (All national parks nationwide, in fact, will waive their admission fees on this day.)

National Park Service Volunteers-in-Parks of all ages will be attired in a range of period clothing illustrating 110 years of history represented at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site and the Vancouver National Historic Reserve. They will stroll down Officers’ Row and along the national park’s historic Parade Ground, stopping outside Eatery at the Grant House.

Visitors are invited to stop and have one-on-one conversations with participants about what was taking place onsite and in the Pacific Northwest during the era each costume represents. Volunteers from the park’s Costume and Textile Department will also be on hand to answer questions about clothing construction and style. Photography is welcome. The event is free and open to everyone.

The Healing Power of Ancient Ceremonies

From 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 30, at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center, author and historian Dr. Cynthia L. Landrum will discuss her recent book, “The Valley of the Kings: Rehabilitation of the People of the Columbia River and Pacific Rim through Ceremonialism.” Following the presentation, Landrum will sign copies of her book, which will be available for sale at the Friends of Fort Vancouver book store in the Visitor Center. This event is hosted by the Friends of Fort Vancouver, in partnership with Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

Landrum’s work explores the painful outcomes of the colonization process in respect to drugs and alcohol use among Pacific Northwest tribes and how it impacts individuals and communities: spiritually, psychologically, emotionally, and socially over time. Landrum’s work also examines the survival of the individual, traditions and cultures, assimilation “norms” versus traditions, and the Native traditions and ceremonies in place to remedy ongoing addiction issues.

Landrum teaches history and Indigenous Nations Studies/United States History at Portland State University and Clark College. She holds a PhD in American Indian History from Oklahoma State University.

The Fort Vancouver Visitor Center is located at 1501 E Evergreen Blvd. in Vancouver. Ample free parking is available on site. There is no charge for this event and everyone is welcome.

Free “Parking” & Summer’s End Promenade

The National Park Service at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site will present the annual Summer’s End Promenade on Saturday, Sept. 30, between 1 and 3 p.m., as part of the national park’s celebration of National Public Lands Day—which includes free entrance to the reconstructed fort, all day long! (All national parks nationwide, in fact, will waive their admission fees on this day.)

National Park Service Volunteers-in-Parks of all ages will be attired in a range of period clothing illustrating 110 years of history represented at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site and the Vancouver National Historic Reserve. They will stroll down Officers’ Row and along the national park’s historic Parade Ground, stopping outside Eatery at the Grant House.

Visitors are invited to stop and have one-on-one conversations with participants about what was taking place onsite and in the Pacific Northwest during the era each costume represents. Volunteers from the park’s Costume and Textile Department will also be on hand to answer questions about clothing construction and style. Photography is welcome. The event is free and open to everyone.

Saber Fights at Fort Vancouver!

The National Park Service and Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, in partnership with Academia Duellatoria, would like to announce a 19th Century Military Saber Training Course, Beginning and Intermediate levels. This course is open to the public, ages 12 and over. The training course lasts seven weeks, and takes place on Sundays, Oct. 1 through Nov. 12, from 4 pm to 5:30 pm, at the Pearson Air Museum Historic Hangar (or outdoors during good weather).

In 1854, troopers with the U.S. Army’s 1st Regiment of Dragoons arrived in the Pacific Northwest. At that time, dragoons (mounted infantry) were the only U.S. Army enlisted-rank soldiers that were issued sabers as part of their personal weaponry. This training course will focus on the saber techniques adopted by the U.S. Army in the mid-19th century. There will also be information provided related to the history of Fort Vancouver, the dragoons and their weaponry, and saber-driven military tactics. Once a certain level of expertise has been achieved, there will be reenactment opportunities for trainees during events at Fort Vancouver National Historic Site.

Unlike sword work seen in the movies and media, true sword training is similar to many other martial arts—requiring physical discipline, mental control, and the development of muscle memory. Beginning Level training will start with basic footwork, then move into solo and partner drills on offensive cuts and thrusts, and defensive guards and parries. The drills provide a good sense of what sparring is like. Intermediate Level training (for those who have previously participated in a Beginning Level training), will consist of additional solo and partner drills focusing on perfecting form and more advanced interactive sequences.

The cost is $100 per person for the seven week training course. Training sabers will be provided. These training sabers have dull edges and rubber covers on the tips. Safety glasses will be provided. To sign up, contact Elaine Dorset at 360-816-6254.

Above image: saber students at last year’s Canterbury Faire in Silverton, Oregon. To see more cool pictures of sword fights and other duelling fun, visit Academia Duellatoria’s Facebook page.

Campfires & Candlelight at Fort Vancouver

On Saturday, Sept. 9, Fort Vancouver National Historic Site will host Campfires & Candlelight, the national park’s largest living history event of the year. Campfires & Candlelight features costumed reenactors who will recreate several time periods in Southwest Washington’s history. The event is free and open to everyone.

Beginning at 4 p.m., the event’s Timeline of History will extend from East 5th St. to the fort gates. The experience will begin with a large World War II encampment, hosted by reenactors from Living History Group Northwest. As visitors make their way towards the reconstructed Fort Vancouver, they will walk back in time. Other encampments will highlight the site’s history of World War I, Buffalo Soldiers, the Oregon Trail, and the Hudson’s Bay Company employee village, a diverse community that was located near Fort Vancouver in the 1830s and 40s. Visitors to the Timeline of History can also enjoy period music provided by the Vancouver Community Concert Band.

At 5 p.m., the gates of Fort Vancouver will open. Inside the fort, visitors will be transported 172 years back in time, to the night of Sept. 9, 1845. Illuminated by candlelight, costumed volunteers will recreate a typical night at Fort Vancouver, and will discuss the most important topic of the day: the international dispute between Great Britain and the United States over their claims to the Pacific Northwest. This event offers a special way to experience the park: at night, with the historic ambiance of candlelight and campfires. To help maintain the atmosphere, the park asks that visitors refrain from using smartphone flashlight applications while attending the event. Ample free parking is available on site.

Campfires & Candlelight at Ft. Vancouver

On Saturday, Sept. 9, Fort Vancouver National Historic Site will host Campfires & Candlelight, the national park’s largest living history event of the year. Campfires & Candlelight features costumed reenactors who will recreate several time periods in Southwest Washington’s history. The event is free and open to everyone.

Beginning at 4 p.m., the event’s Timeline of History will extend from East 5th St. to the fort gates. The experience will begin with a large World War II encampment, hosted by reenactors from Living History Group Northwest. As visitors make their way towards the reconstructed Fort Vancouver, they will walk back in time. Other encampments will highlight the site’s history of World War I, Buffalo Soldiers, the Oregon Trail, and the Hudson’s Bay Company employee village, a diverse community that was located near Fort Vancouver in the 1830s and 40s. Visitors to the Timeline of History can also enjoy period music provided by the Vancouver Community Concert Band.

At 5 p.m., the gates of Fort Vancouver will open. Inside the fort, visitors will be transported 172 years back in time, to the night of Sept. 9, 1845. Illuminated by candlelight, costumed volunteers will recreate a typical night at Fort Vancouver, and will discuss the most important topic of the day: the international dispute between Great Britain and the United States over their claims to the Pacific Northwest. This event offers a special way to experience the park: at night, with the historic ambiance of candlelight and campfires. To help maintain the atmosphere, the park asks that visitors refrain from using smartphone flashlight applications while attending the event. Ample free parking is available on site.

Photo courtesy of the National Park Service at Fort Vancouver.

Junior Ranger Day at Fort Vancouver

As part of the National Park Service’s 101st birthday celebration, the National Park Service at Fort Vancouver is offering two Junior Ranger Days: free, fun, kid-friendly activities on Friday, Aug. 25, and Saturday, Aug. 26. Junior Ranger Day is a time where kids can get hands-on, interactive experience inside the reconstructed Fort, at the Visitor Center, and at Pearson Air Museum. Kids will have hoot and learn about history in the way they learn best: by seeing, touching, and doing. (…and honestly, it’s just as interesting and fun for the parents as it is for the kids!) Two Junior Ranger Days will be offered for kids ages six to 12.

  • Junior Ranger Day at Fort Vancouver, ages 6-12: Friday, Aug. 25, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Junior Ranger Day at Pearson Air Museum, ages 6-12, Saturday, Aug. 26, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Little Learners at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center, ages 2-5: Saturday, Aug. 26, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

At Pearson Air Museum, aspiring Junior Rangers can complete a Junior Ranger Aeronautical Booklet that includes a basic aeronautics course, puzzles, and more. Junior Rangers will work with park rangers and park volunteers to build balsa wood aircraft, and construct and launch two-liter rockets. At the reconstructed fort site, Junior Rangers can explore the British Hudson’s Bay Company’s Fort Vancouver and learn from costumed volunteers about the people, events, and practices of the past. At the Visitor Center, toddlers, preschoolers, and their parents and caregivers can join a drop-in program designed especially for young children. For more information, call 360-816-6230.

Above image courtesy of the National Park Service at Fort Vancouver.

Junior Ranger Days at Fort Vancouver

As part of the National Park Service’s 101st birthday celebration, the National Park Service at Fort Vancouver is offering two Junior Ranger Days: free, fun, kid-friendly activities on Friday, Aug. 25, and Saturday, Aug. 26. Junior Ranger Day is a time where kids can get hands-on, interactive experience inside the reconstructed Fort, at the Visitor Center, and at Pearson Air Museum. Kids will have hoot and learn about history in the way they learn best: by seeing, touching, and doing. (…and honestly, it’s just as interesting and fun for the parents as it is for the kids!) Two Junior Ranger Days will be offered for kids ages six to 12.

  • Junior Ranger Day at Fort Vancouver, ages 6-12: Friday, Aug. 25, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Junior Ranger Day at Pearson Air Museum, ages 6-12, Saturday, Aug. 26, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Little Learners at the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center, ages 2-5: Saturday, Aug. 26, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

At Pearson Air Museum, aspiring Junior Rangers can complete a Junior Ranger Aeronautical Booklet that includes a basic aeronautics course, puzzles, and more. Junior Rangers will work with park rangers and park volunteers to build balsa wood aircraft, and construct and launch two-liter rockets. At the reconstructed fort site, Junior Rangers can explore the British Hudson’s Bay Company’s Fort Vancouver and learn from costumed volunteers about the people, events, and practices of the past. At the Visitor Center, toddlers, preschoolers, and their parents and caregivers can join a drop-in program designed especially for young children. For more information, call 360-816-6230.

Watch the Eclipse at Fort Vancouver

On Monday, Aug. 21, a solar eclipse will cross the continental United States for the first time in 38 years. National parks across the country are planning special eclipse-viewing events, including Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. You can come to the fort to view the eclipse safely—and for free!

Though the park is usually closed on Mondays, the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Visitors are welcome to view the eclipse from the vantage point of the park’s Parade Ground or Great Meadow. Throughout the event, national park rangers will be roving the park grounds to answer questions. The eclipse will begin at 9:06 a.m. and will end at 11:38 a.m. The Couve isn’t in the path of totality, but it is very close! Visitors to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site on the day of the eclipse will see the moon cover 99% of our view of the sun. The period of 99% totality will occur at 10:19 a.m.

From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Friends of Fort Vancouver bookstore at the Visitor Center will also be open. Eclipse viewing glasses, which allow their wearers to look at the eclipse safely, will be for sale. At the bookstore, artist Lillian Pitt will launch her exclusive new line of “Eclipse Over Warm Springs” jewelry and masks. At 11:30 a.m., as the eclipse ends, Confluence Project Historian Mary Rose will present “Plunge into Darkness: Historical Eclipses that Crossed the Pacific Northwest,” a special lecture on the history of eclipses in our region. This talk will also take place at the Visitor Center.

The Fort Vancouver Visitor Center  is located at 1501 E Evergreen Blvd. in Vancouver and free parking is available in the adjacent lot—although additional parking may be provided at other locations for this event. Other park facilities (including the reconstructed fort and Pearson Air Museum) will remain closed.

Note to eclipse viewers: It’s never safe to look at the sun except for the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality. The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters such as “eclipse glasses” or handheld solar viewers that meet the ISO 12312-2 international standards for such products. Learn more about viewing the eclipse safely at https://www.nps.gov/articles/eclipsesafety.htm.

“Bark Ranger” Dog-Friendly Walking Tour of Fort Vancouver

On Saturday, Aug. 19, at 10 a.m., Fort Vancouver National Historic Site will host a new “Bark Ranger” walking tour program. This free, ranger-led tour, designed for visitors and their dogs, will discuss the history of dogs at Fort Vancouver and Vancouver Barracks, as well as the overall history of the site. The tour will also highlight how to explore the park safely with pet dogs.

The tour will begin outside of Pearson Air Museum, 1115 E. 5th St. The shorter first leg of the tour will cover a distance of about a half-mile on a paved trail with little incline, and will discuss the history of dogs during the site’s Hudson’s Bay Company period. The optional second leg of the tour will cover an additional distance of about three-quarters of a mile with a moderate incline, and will discuss the history of dogs during the U.S. Army period.

You don’t HAVE to bring your dog if you don’t want to, but dogs are welcome on this tour. Dogs on the tour should be friendly with other dogs and people and up-to-date on vaccines. Participants with dogs must bring waste bags, food and water as necessary, and a leash no longer than six feet. In case of inclement weather, this tour may be rescheduled (although it’s predicted to be fair and sunny). Check www.nps.gov/fova, or the park’s Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FortVancouver/) or Twitter pages (@FtVancouverNPS) for updates.

Watch the Eclipse at Fort Vancouver

On Monday, Aug. 21, a solar eclipse will cross the continental United States for the first time in 38 years. National parks across the country are planning special eclipse-viewing events, including Fort Vancouver National Historic Site. You can come to the fort to view the eclipse safely—and for free!

Though the park is usually closed on Mondays, the Fort Vancouver Visitor Center will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Visitors are welcome to view the eclipse from the vantage point of the park’s Parade Ground or Great Meadow. Throughout the event, national park rangers will be roving the park grounds to answer questions. The eclipse will begin at 9:06 a.m. and will end at 11:38 a.m. The Couve isn’t in the path of totality, but it is very close! Visitors to Fort Vancouver National Historic Site on the day of the eclipse will see the moon cover 99% of our view of the sun. The period of 99% totality will occur at 10:19 a.m.

From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Friends of Fort Vancouver bookstore at the Visitor Center will also be open. Eclipse viewing glasses, which allow their wearers to look at the eclipse safely, will be for sale. At the bookstore, artist Lillian Pitt will launch her exclusive new line of “Eclipse Over Warm Springs” jewelry and masks. At 11:30 a.m., as the eclipse ends, Confluence Project Historian Mary Rose will present “Plunge into Darkness: Historical Eclipses that Crossed the Pacific Northwest,” a special lecture on the history of eclipses in our region. This talk will also take place at the Visitor Center.

The Fort Vancouver Visitor Center  is located at 1501 E Evergreen Blvd. in Vancouver and free parking is available in the adjacent lot—although additional parking may be provided at other locations for this event. Other park facilities (including the reconstructed fort and Pearson Air Museum) will remain closed.

Note to eclipse viewers: It’s never safe to look at the sun except for the brief total phase of a solar eclipse (“totality”), when the moon entirely blocks the sun’s bright face, which will happen only within the narrow path of totality. The only safe way to look directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters such as “eclipse glasses” or handheld solar viewers that meet the ISO 12312-2 international standards for such products. Learn more about viewing the eclipse safely at https://www.nps.gov/articles/eclipsesafety.htm.

“Bark Ranger” Dog-Friendly Walking Tour of Fort Vancouver

On Saturday, Aug. 19, at 10 a.m., Fort Vancouver National Historic Site will host a new “Bark Ranger” walking tour program. This free, ranger-led tour, designed for visitors and their dogs, will discuss the history of dogs at Fort Vancouver and Vancouver Barracks, as well as the overall history of the site. The tour will also highlight how to explore the park safely with pet dogs.

The tour will begin outside of Pearson Air Museum, 1115 E. 5th St. The shorter first leg of the tour will cover a distance of about a half-mile on a paved trail with little incline, and will discuss the history of dogs during the site’s Hudson’s Bay Company period. The optional second leg of the tour will cover an additional distance of about three-quarters of a mile with a moderate incline, and will discuss the history of dogs during the U.S. Army period.

You don’t HAVE to bring your dog if you don’t want to, but dogs are welcome on this tour. Dogs on the tour should be friendly with other dogs and people and up-to-date on vaccines. Participants with dogs must bring waste bags, food and water as necessary, and a leash no longer than six feet. In case of inclement weather, this tour may be rescheduled (although it’s predicted to be fair and sunny). Check www.nps.gov/fova, or the park’s Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/FortVancouver/) or Twitter pages (@FtVancouverNPS) for updates.

Above image courtesy of the National Park Service at Fort Vancouver