CRESA

CRESA Presents Home Alone at the Kiggins

Nothing says Christmas like…HOLY COW! Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency (CRESA) is sponsoring a free showing of the holiday classic Home Alone at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 8, at the Kiggins Theatre. This is one in a series of Disaster Movie Nights (tagline “Lights, Camera, Disaster!”) hosted by CRESA to raise awareness about disaster preparedness…while having a bit of fun and munching on really good hot buttered popcorn. Home Alone isn’t exactly a disaster movie (unless you’re the ill-fated burglers who want to break into Kevin McAllister’s house) but it is good fun and—in case someone really does try to break into your house—you might want to note that nifty trick with the iron.

It’s hard to believe, but 2016 marks the 25th anniversary of the film’s original release. It stars Macaulay Culkin as McAllister, plus hilarious turns by Daniel Stern, Joe Pesci, Catherine O’Hara, John Heard, and Kieran Culkin. The movie, which was written by John Hughes and directed by Chris Columbus, is rated PG and has a running time of one hour and 43 minutes. The Kiggins Theatre is located at 1011 Main St. in downtown Vancouver. Doors will open at 6 p.m. for this film. The movie is free, but be sure and thank the Kiggins by purchasing something yummy from the concession stand in the lobby, or something festively alcoholic from the gorgeous Marquee Lounge upstairs. For more information, visit www.kigginstheatre.net.

Free Showing of “The Great Outdoors”

The 1988 film “The Great Outdoors,” isn’t exactly a disaster movie in the classic, terrifying sense, but more in the comedic, things-get-weird sense—nevertheless, Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency (CRESA) and Paul Davis Restoration are sponsoring a free showing of this movie as part of CRESA’s Disaster Movie Nights series. The movie will be shown at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 15, at the Kiggins Theatre. Doors open at 6 p.m. and there will be door prizes and other fun!

Disaster Movie Nights are hosted by CRESA to raise awareness about disaster preparedness…while having a bit of fun and munching on really good hot buttered popcorn. CRESA will be on hand before and after the moving to talk about the hazards of living in Clark County (overdosing on natural Northwest beauty?) and what we can do to be ready should the worst happen (or if we happen to go camping with people we don’t like). In case you didn’t see The Great Outdoors the first time around, here’s a recap:

Big-hearted Chicago family man Chet (John Candy) wants nothing more than to take his family to a lakeside resort area woods for a peaceful vacation, even though his wife and kids aren’t quite as excited as he is about roughing it. But the tranquility is shattered when his annoying in-laws (led by Dan Aykroyd) show up unexpected.

The Kiggins Theatre is located at 1011 Main St. in downtown Vancouver. For more information, visit www.kigginstheatre.net.

Free Showing of The Great Outdoors

The 1988 film “The Great Outdoors,” isn’t exactly a disaster movie in the classic, terrifying sense, but more in the comedic, things-get-weird sense—nevertheless, Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency (CRESA) and Paul Davis Restoration are sponsoring a free showing of this movie as part of CRESA’s Disaster Movie Nights series. The movie will be shown at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 15, at the Kiggins Theatre. Doors open at 6 p.m. and there will be door prizes and other fun!

Disaster Movie Nights are hosted by CRESA to raise awareness about disaster preparedness…while having a bit of fun and munching on really good hot buttered popcorn. CRESA will be on hand before and after the moving to talk about the hazards of living in Clark County (overdosing on natural Northwest beauty?) and what we can do to be ready should the worst happen (or if we happen to go camping with people we don’t like). In case you didn’t see The Great Outdoors the first time around, here’s a recap:

Big-hearted Chicago family man Chet (John Candy) wants nothing more than to take his family to a lakeside resort area woods for a peaceful vacation, even though his wife and kids aren’t quite as excited as he is about roughing it. But the tranquility is shattered when his annoying in-laws (led by Dan Aykroyd) show up unexpected.

The Kiggins Theatre is located at 1011 Main St. in downtown Vancouver. For more information, visit www.kigginstheatre.net.

30 Days, 30 Ways

September is National Preparedness Month, which means that public safety agencies are working on unusual ways to ensure that local residents are educated, informed, and ready to face any type of crisis situation. This year’s theme is “Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today,” and Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency (CRESA) will help you get ready with the 30 Days, 30 Ways Preparedness Challenge (www.30days30ways.com).

Players are given a daily challenge at 7 a.m. starting Monday, Sept. 1, and lasting until Sept. 30. Players may submit replies to each of the tasks involved throughout the month to either Facebook, Twitter, by commenting on the 3O Days blog, or by e-mail. Players can choose to play as many days as they would like throughout the month. Players may also catch up and complete past tasks for the month if they miss any days. All tasks will be short and will not require a significant amount of time to complete.

CRESA’s primary goal is for people to share information about emergency preparedness on social media in order to reach people who may not otherwise think about being ready for disasters. Submissions will be reviewed for creativity, relativity to the task, and popularity. Winners will be rewarded with Amazon gift cards, to be selected in October.

Free Seminar: Preparing for the Big One

You may have heard rumbling rumors about the Cascadia Subduction Zone, a mega-quake-producing faultline that runs from Northern California to Vancouver Island, just about 70 miles off the coast. The faultline has been the source of massive quakes in the past, and we’re about due for another. Estimates put the magnitude of a large earthquake somewhere between 8.7 and 9.2 on the Richter scale, a devastating seismic event which would produce a 20-foot tsunami at the coast and result in noticeable shaking as far east as Spokane. Buildings, roads, and bridges in our region could be wiped out, and vital services such as water and electricity disrupted for many weeks. (For further reading on this subject, see “The Really Big One,” which appeared in the July 2015 issue of The New Yorker.)

While there’s no way to avoid such a quake if it happens, there are many ways to prepare, such as by storing water and food, creating earthquake survival kits for your home and car, making minor household changes like installing latches on cabinets and removing heavy objects from high places, and creating a family meet-up plan. Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency is hosting a free seminars that will inform you about what to expect—and how to get ready—for a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. Scott Johnson will give a detailed presentation and answer questions on Thursday, March 24, at WSU Vancouver. The same seminar will be offered at two separate times—noon and 2 p.m.—in the Dengerink Administration Building, Room 100.

Guests can come as early at 11 a.m. and stay as late as 3 p.m. Raffle prizes and 100 starter kits will be given out. Guests are invited to browse emergency products, learn about local resources and pick up a to-go snack (while supplies last) in Rooms 129 and 130. On-site vendors include the American Red Cross, Emergency Essentials, Thrive Life, and Titan Ready USA. WSU Vancouver is located at 14204 N.E. Salmon Creek Ave. in the Salmon Creek area of Vancouver.

Preparing for The Really Big One

You may have heard rumbling rumors about the Cascadia Subduction Zone, a mega-quake-producing faultline that runs from Northern California to Vancouver Island, just about 70 miles off the coast. The faultline has been the source of massive quakes in the past, and we’re about due for another. Estimates put the magnitude of a large earthquake somewhere between 8.7 and 9.2 on the Richter scale, a devastating seismic event which would produce a 20-foot tsunami at the coast and result in noticeable shaking as far east as Spokane. Buildings, roads, and bridges in our region could be wiped out, and vital services such as water and electricity disrupted for many weeks. (For further reading on this subject, see “The Really Big One,” which appeared in the July 2015 issue of The New Yorker.)

While there’s no way to avoid such a quake if it happens, there are many ways to prepare, such as by storing water and food, creating earthquake survival kits for your home and car, making minor household changes like installing latches on cabinets and removing heavy objects from high places, and creating a family meet-up plan. Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency is hosting a free seminars that will inform you about what to expect—and how to get ready—for a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. Scott Johnson will give a detailed presentation and answer questions on Thursday, March 24, at WSU Vancouver. The same seminar will be offered at two separate times—noon and 2 p.m.—in the Dengerink Administration Building, Room 100.

Guests can come as early at 11 a.m. and stay as late as 3 p.m. Raffle prizes and 100 starter kits will be given out. Guests are invited to browse emergency products, learn about local resources and pick up a to-go snack (while supplies last) in Rooms 129 and 130. On-site vendors include the American Red Cross, Emergency Essentials, Thrive Life, and Titan Ready USA. WSU Vancouver is located at 14204 N.E. Salmon Creek Ave. in the Salmon Creek area of Vancouver.

Above image: road damage on Hwy. 302 after the 2011 Nisqually earthquake

CRESA hosts “The Wave” at The Kiggins

Want to get good and scared? Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency (CRESA) is sponsoring a free showing of the disaster movie “The Wave” at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, March 4, at the Kiggins Theatre. This is the first in a series of Disaster Movie Nights (tagline “Lights, Camera, Disaster!”) hosted by CRESA to raise awareness about disaster preparedness…while having a bit of fun and munching on really good hot buttered popcorn. CRESA will be on hand before and after the moving to talk about the hazards of living in Clark County (although tsunamis, thank goodness, aren’t among them) and what we can do to be ready should the worst happen.

The Wave is a Norwegian-made film that follows geologist Kristian Eikfjord and his family, who live in the idyllic lakeside resort village of Geiranger. Eikfjord has accepted a new job with a big oil company. Their belongings are packed, the moving van has already left, and Eikfjord will spend one last night in the village with his wife and children. That night, a large crevice splits open along the lake’s stony shoreline, spilling thousands of tons of rock into the lake and creating a massive tsunami. With less than 10 minutes to reach high ground before the town is flooded, Eikfjord must save as many people as possible—including his own family. The Wave is based on true events; a rock-slide tsunami incident destroyed a Norwegian town on April 7, 1934, killing 40 people.

The movie is rated R and (not surprisingly) contains scenes that would be frightening for children and teens (and will probably frighten you, too). The Kiggins Theatre is located at 1011 Main St. in downtown Vancouver. Doors will open at 6:45 p.m. for this film. Tickets for additional showings on March 5-8 are available at the door. Tickets are $6 for shows starting before 6 p.m., and $7 for shows after. For more information, visit www.kigginstheatre.net.

CRESA & The Wave

Want to get good and scared? Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency (CRESA) is sponsoring a free showing of the disaster movie “The Wave” at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, March 4, at the Kiggins Theatre. This is the first in a series of Disaster Movie Nights (tagline “Lights, Camera, Disaster!”) hosted by CRESA to raise awareness about disaster preparedness…while having a bit of fun and munching on really good hot buttered popcorn. CRESA will be on hand before and after the moving to talk about the hazards of living in Clark County (although tsunamis, thank goodness, aren’t among them) and what we can do to be ready should the worst happen.

The Wave is a Norwegian-made film that follows geologist Kristian Eikfjord and his family, who live in the idyllic lakeside resort village of Geiranger. Eikfjord has accepted a new job with a big oil company. Their belongings are packed, the moving van has already left, and Eikfjord will spend one last night in the village with his wife and children. That night, a large crevice splits open along the lake’s stony shoreline, spilling thousands of tons of rock into the lake and creating a massive tsunami. With less than 10 minutes to reach high ground before the town is flooded, Eikfjord must save as many people as possible—including his own family. The Wave is based on true events; a rock-slide tsunami incident destroyed a Norwegian town on April 7, 1934, killing 40 people.

The movie is rated R and (not surprisingly) contains scenes that would be frightening for children and teens (and will probably frighten you, too). The Kiggins Theatre is located at 1011 Main St. in downtown Vancouver. Doors will open at 6:45 p.m. for this film. Tickets for additional showings on March 5-8 are available at the door. Tickets are $6 for shows starting before 6 p.m., and $7 for shows after. For more information, visit www.kigginstheatre.net. If you dare, you can watch the spine-tingling trailer below.

Always Be Ready

FirstAidKitHere’s a cheery topic: disasters, natural and otherwise. It’s easy to feel helpless in the face of forces we can’t control, but there’s something we do have the power to do: be prepared. The ability of a community to bounce back after any catastrophe depends on its people, and the more educated we are, the safer we’ll be.

At 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 4, the Camas Public Library welcomes Eric Frank, the education and public outreach coordinator for CRESA, Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency. He’ll cover several topics in this free public workshop, including:

  • Emergency management
  • How you can be prepared
  • Making an emergency preparedness kit
  • Having a plan
  • Getting involved
  • Before a disaster strikes
  • During a disaster
  • Being a valuable community partner

The Camas Public Library is located at 625 N.E. Fourth Ave. in downtown Camas. For more information, call 360-834-4692 or visit www.camaslibrary.org.

30 Days, 30 Ways

September is National Preparedness Month, which means that public safety agencies are working on unusual ways to ensure that local residents are educated, informed, and ready to face any type of crisis situation. This year’s theme is “Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare!” and Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency (CRESA) will help you take action with the 30 Days, 30 Ways Preparedness Challenge (www.30days30ways.com).

Players are given a daily challenge at 7 a.m. starting Monday, Sept. 1, and lasting until Sept. 30. Players may submit replies to each of the tasks involved throughout the month to either Facebook, Twitter, by commenting on the 3O Days blog, or by e-mail. Players can choose to play as many days as they would like throughout the month. Players may also catch up and complete past tasks for the month if they miss any days. All tasks will be short and will not require a significant amount of time to complete.

CRESA’s primary goal is for people to share information about emergency preparedness on social media in order to reach people who may not otherwise think about being ready for disasters. Submissions will be reviewed for creativity, relativity to the task, and popularity. Winners will be rewarded with Amazon gift cards. There will also be two Grand Prize winners of $50 Amazaon gift cards, to be selected in October.