Clark County Historical Museum

Go Underground and Say Farewell to Hats!

Who says adulthood isn't fun? No one at the next Museum Underground, happening at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, March 7. This is a 21-and-over event, with fun things to drink and a happenin' local band, The Swingtown Vipers. (It's GOT to be good if it's got "swing" and "vipers" in its name, right?)

Museum Underground is a grown-up sort of party at the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM), but there's nothing fusty or dusty or stiff-upper-lip about it. This lively soirée happens on the first Friday of every month, with live music, beer and wine, and light refreshments. Each month, Museum Underground features a different band, or artist, or both. March is special, however, because Undergrounders are bidding farewell to CCHM's popular exhibit, "Hats!" which is closing later this month after an extended run. Partygoers are encouraged to tip their hats—so to speak—to the theme by wearing their fanciest, most avant-garde headwear.

Tickets are $8 for CCHS members and $10 for non-members. RSVP by e-mailing info@cchmuseum.org or calling 360-993-5679. Tickets will also be available at the door.

 

 

Hats Off to “Hats!”

cchm07504tHang on to your hats—this is your last opportunity to see the miracle of millinery that is "Hats!" at the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM). The final day to view the exhibit was supposed to be Friday, Feb. 28, but the museum pulled a rabbit out of its—ahem, hat—and has extended the exhibit until Saturday, March 22, to coincide with the Women's History Month Luncheon on Monday, March 17. And that's no hat trick.

The Hats! exhibit explores the form and function of headwear in Clark County and beyond. Highlights from the museum’s collection include a bonnet that traveled along the Oregon Trail in 1852, a hat worn and donated by First Lady Mamie Eisenhower to a local women’s group;, a dress uniform hat belonging to General T.M. Anderson of the Vancouver Barracks, and a silk top hat worn by Amos F. Shaw to the first Washington State Legislature in 1889.

CCHM is located at 1511 Main St. in downtown Vancouver. The museum is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday, and from 5 to 9 p.m. on the first Thursday of February through November. Admission is $4 for adults, $3 for seniors/students, $2 for children, $10 for families, and free for CCHS members and active duty military personnel and their families. For more information, call 360-993-5679 or visit www.cchmuseum.org.

 

Millinery Update: Women’s History Luncheon

You've surely heard that old trope, "A hat of beauty is a joy forever." Some people might say that hats are unecessary or frivolous. Those people might also say that fashion is unecessary and frivolous, but really, that's so last year. Anyway, hats are functional as well as fashionable: they warm your head in winter or keep the sun out of your eyes in summer. Hats are the frosting on the cake of your outfit, and what sweeter way to celebrate this wonderful accessory than at the Women's History Month Luncheon, to be held at the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Monday, March 17?

The keynote speaker is Barbara Creager of Babette’s Hatworks, and she'll tell you everything you ever wanted to know but were afraid to ask about hats: how to buy a hat that compliments you, how to choose the correct size, how to wear it properly, how to use hat pins, and how to store your hats, for starters. And for those attendees who feel that they don't have quite enough hats, Creager will also bring several hats to sell. This hats-themed luncheon complements the CCHM's current "Hats!" exhibit, which has been given an extended run until Saturday, March 22.

The Grant House will provide a buffet-style lunch, including half-sandwiches, green salad, pasta salad, seasonal fruit, miniature cheesecakes, berry tartlets, chocolate torte bites, coffee and iced tea. Tickets—which ought to be purchased soon, because this popular event is expected to sell out early—are $35 for Clark County Historical Society members and $40 for non-members. To secure your ticket, call the museum at 360-993-5679. And please, by all means, wear a hat.

 

Women’s History Month Luncheon

Hats are the frosting on the cake of your outfit, and what sweeter way to celebrate this wonderful accessory than at the Women's History Month Luncheon, to be held at the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM).

The keynote speaker is Barbara Creager of Babette’s Hatworks, and she'll tell you everything you ever wanted to know but were afraid to ask about hats: how to buy a hat that compliments you, how to choose the correct size, how to wear it properly, how to use hat pins, and how to store your hats, for starters. And for those attendees who feel that they don't have quite enough hats, Creager will also bring several hats to sell. This hats-themed luncheon complements the CCHM's current "Hats!" exhibit, which has been given an extended run until Saturday, March 22.

The Grant House will provide a buffet-style lunch, including half-sandwiches, green salad, pasta salad, seasonal fruit, miniature cheesecakes, berry tartlets, chocolate torte bites, coffee and iced tea. Tickets—which ought to be purchased soon, because this popular event is expected to sell out early—are $35 for Clark County Historical Society members and $40 for non-members. To secure your ticket, call the museum at 360-993-5679.

Final Week of “Hats!”

Hang on to your hats—this is your last opportunity to see the miracle of millinery that is "Hats!" at the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM). The final day to view the exhibit was supposed to be Friday, Feb. 28, but the museum pulled a rabbit out of its—ahem, hat—and has extended the exhibit until Saturday, March 22. And that's no hat trick.

The Hats! exhibit explores the form and function of headwear in Clark County and beyond. Highlights from the museum’s collection include a bonnet that traveled along the Oregon Trail in 1852, a hat worn and donated by First Lady Mamie Eisenhower to a local women’s group;, a dress uniform hat belonging to General T.M. Anderson of the Vancouver Barracks, and a silk top hat worn by Amos F. Shaw to the first Washington State Legislature in 1889.

CCHM is located at 1511 Main St. in downtown Vancouver. The museum is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday, and from 5 to 9 p.m. on the first Thursday of February through November. Admission is $4 for adults, $3 for seniors/students, $2 for children, $10 for families, and free for CCHS members and active duty military personnel and their families. For more information, call 360-993-5679 or visit www.cchmuseum.org.

CCHM First Thursday: David Douglas

As you explore the Northwest's glorious flora-and-fauna-covered landscape, don't you sometimes think, "Wow, I really wish I knew more about 19th Century Scottish naturalist David Douglas"? Lucky for you, the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) is hosting an event that's all about David Douglas (for whom the lovely Douglas Fir is named). The next First Thursday Museum After Hours—a monthly happening in which the museum stays open late to host gatherings about various interesting topics and to allow museumgoers to browse exhibits during off-hours—will feature author, teacher, and naturalist Jack Nisbet with a scintillating presentation about guess who? (That's right. David Douglas.)

Douglas was Fort Vancouver's resident naturalist from 1825 to 1834, and had all sorts of lively adventures, both inside and outside the Fort's confines. First Thursday attendees will hear stories about the plants, animals, and people that Douglas observed, as well as lots of excellent stories about Douglas himself.

Nesbit's presentation will begin at 7 p.m., and CCHM will be open for Museum After Hours from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Refreshments will be provided by The Grant House restaurant. CCHM members and active duty military families with ID get in free; otherwise, regular admission fees apply.

Above: detail from an 1829 portrait of David Douglas by Daniel Macnee; Linnean Society, London.

Shadows of Conflict at CCHM

The Clark County HIstorical Museum (CCHM, as we affectionately call it) has just opened a fascinating new exhibit about Clark County during the Civil War. While no military battles were fought here, the issues that drove our nation to war were just as relevant—and just as wrenching—in the West, and that includes our little corner of the Northwest, which played its part in the War for the Union. "Shadows of Conflict: Clarke County and the Civil War," which debuted on March 25 and will remain at the museum until Feb. 28, 2015, allows visitors to explore artifacts, documents, and images to understand how the war's long shadow touched Clark County and its citizens.

To mark the beginning of the exhibit, the CCHM will host an opening reception during downtown Vancouver's First Friday Artwalk on Friday, April 4. Drop by the museum any time from 5 to 7 p.m. and be among the first to view the exhibit while enjoying refreshment and the nationally-recognized fiddle and guitar duo Jonathan Trawick and Aarun Carter. The museum is located at 1511 Main St. For more details about this and other exhibits, visit www.cchmuseum.org.

“Shadows of Conflict” Exhibit Reception at CCHM

The Clark County HIstorical Museum has just opened a fascinating new exhibit about Clark County during the Civil War. While no military battles were fought here, the issues that drove our nation to war were just as relevant—and just as wrenching—in the West, and that includes our little corner of the Northwest, which played its part in the War for the Union. "Shadows of Conflict: Clarke County and the Civil War," which debuted on March 25 and will remain at the museum until Feb. 28, 2015, allows visitors to explore artifacts, documents, and images to understand how the war's long shadow touched Clark County and its citizens.

To mark the beginning of the exhibit, the CCHM will host an opening reception during downtown Vancouver's First Friday Artwalk on Friday, April 4. Drop by the museum any time from 5 to 7 p.m. and be among the first to view the exhibit while enjoying refreshment and the nationally-recognized fiddle and guitar duo Jonathan Trawick and Aarun Carter. For more details about this and other exhibits, visit www.cchmuseum.org.

First Thursday Museum After Hours: David Douglas

As you explore the Northwest's glorious flora-and-fauna-covered landscape, don't you sometimes think, "Wow, I really wish I knew more about 19th Century Scottish naturalist David Douglas"? Lucky for you, the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) is hosting an event tha's all about David Douglas (for whom the lovely Douglas Fir is named). The next First Thursday Museum After Hours—a monthly happening in which the museum stays open late to host gatherings about various interesting topics and to allow museumgoers to browse exhibits during off-hours—will feature author, teacher, and naturalist Jack Nisbet with a scintillating presentation about guess who? (That's right. David Douglas.)

Douglas was Fort Vancouver's resident naturalist from 1825 to 1834, and had all sorts of lively adventures, both inside and outside the Fort's confines. First Thursday attendees will hear stories about the plants, animals, and people that Douglas observed, as well as lots of excellent stories about Douglas himself.

Nesbit's presentation will begin at 7 p.m., and CCHM will be open for Museum After Hours from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Refreshments will be provided by The Grant House restaurant. CCHM members and active duty military families with ID get in free; otherwise, regular admission fees apply.

Book Discussion Group at CCHM

In conjunction with the exhibit, "Labor: A Working History," the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) is hosting a three-part discussion series for those who want to dig deeper into labor history. Read one (or all) of the books and then participate in book discussions hosted by humanities scholar authors who will provide additional insights and expertise. The books, which are available now at the museum, have been provided by the Friends of the Vancouver Community Library and will be distributed free of charge to participants. All groups meet from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays at CCHM.

  • April 12: Sandy Polishuk will discuss her book, "Sticking to the Union: An Oral History of the Life and Times of Julia Ruuttila."
  • April 26: Dr. Laurie Mercier will discuss her book, "Anaconda: Labor, Community and Culture in Montana’s Smelter City."
  • May 3: Dr. Erasmo Gamboa will discuss his book, "Mexican Labor and World War II: Braceros in the Pacific Northwest."

A public wrap-up discussion will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 3, at the CCHM. This series is sponsored in part by Southwest Washington Central Labor Council and Humanities Washington in addition to the Friends of the Vancouver Community Library. For more details or to sign up for the discussion groups, visit www.cchmuseum.org or click here.

Garden Walking Tour of Arnada

Vancouver's Arnada neighborhood is well-known locally for its beautiful old houses and its even more beautiful gardens. These carefully cultivated yards remind us that the era of gracious living has not passed—not while flowers still bloom, and not while there are gardeners who still lovingly tend them. The Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) knows that sometimes the best way to appreciate our city's heritage is to get outside and see it—and what better way than a guided walking tour to help you learn about and better appreciate what you see?
 
With that in mind, the CCHM is hosting a Garden Walking Tour of the charming and history-rich Arnada neighborhood on Saturday, May 17. Participants will hear engaging stories about the history of notable Arnada homes whilst viewing their lovely contemporary gardens from the (non-muddy) sidewalk. Tour guides Brad Richardson and Barbara Clark will begin this one-time tour at 12 noon at the CCHM. Tickets are $5 for Clark County Historical Society members and $7 for non-members. Reservations are required by calling 360-993-5679.
 
Editor's note: We visited the CCHM website this morning (May 16) and found that this event has sold out! Even the waiting list is full! However, we placed a quick call to the museum, and the friendly staff informed us that there will be more walking tours of the Arnada neighborhood this summer and fall. The museum partners with Master Gardener Barbara Clark to choose gardens that look the most beautiful, according to the season. Keep checking North Bank Now for more articles about CCHM walking tours…

CCHM Book Discussion Group

In conjunction with the exhibit, "Labor: A Working History," the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) is hosting a three-part discussion series for those who want to dig deeper into labor history. Read one (or all) of the books and then participate in book discussions hosted by humanities scholar authors who will provide additional insights and expertise. The books, which are available now at the museum, have been provided by the Friends of the Vancouver Community Library and will be distributed free of charge to participants. All groups meet from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays at CCHM.

  • April 12: Sandy Polishuk will discuss her book, "Sticking to the Union: An Oral History of the Life and Times of Julia Ruuttila."
  • April 26: Dr. Laurie Mercier will discuss her book, "Anaconda: Labor, Community and Culture in Montana’s Smelter City."
  • May 3: Dr. Erasmo Gamboa will discuss his book, "Mexican Labor and World War II: Braceros in the Pacific Northwest."

A public wrap-up discussion will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 3, at the CCHM. This series is sponsored in part by Southwest Washington Central Labor Council and Humanities Washington in addition to the Friends of the Vancouver Community Library. For more details or to sign up for the discussion groups, visit www.cchmuseum.org or click here.

CCHM Book Discussion Group

In conjunction with the exhibit, "Labor: A Working History," the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) is hosting a three-part discussion series for those who want to dig deeper into labor history. Read one (or all) of the books and then participate in book discussions hosted by humanities scholar authors who will provide additional insights and expertise. The books, which are available now at the museum, have been provided by the Friends of the Vancouver Community Library and will be distributed free of charge to participants. All groups meet from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays at CCHM.

  • April 12: Sandy Polishuk will discuss her book, "Sticking to the Union: An Oral History of the Life and Times of Julia Ruuttila."
  • April 26: Dr. Laurie Mercier will discuss her book, "Anaconda: Labor, Community and Culture in Montana’s Smelter City."
  • May 3: Dr. Erasmo Gamboa will discuss his book, "Mexican Labor and World War II: Braceros in the Pacific Northwest."

A public wrap-up discussion will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 3, at the CCHM. This series is sponsored in part by Southwest Washington Central Labor Council and Humanities Washington in addition to the Friends of the Vancouver Community Library. For more details or to sign up for the discussion groups, visit www.cchmuseum.org or click here.

Doug Smith at CCHM Dinner Auction

The Clark County HIstorical Museum (CCHM)'s Annual Dinner Auction will feature Grammy Award-winning acoustic guitarist Doug Smith at Club Green Meadows on Saturday, May 10. This month marks the CCHM's golden anniversary: the museum was first opened to the public 50 years ago, on May 24, 1964. The museum's annual fundraising event begins with a silent auction at 5 p.m., followed by a catered dinner and live auction. Proceeds from the evening will support the CCHM’s many contributions to the educational and cultural life of Vancouver and Clark County. 

In addition to his Grammy award, Smith is also the 2006 winner of the Winfield International Fingerstyle Guitar Competition. His playing can be heard in the film "August Rush" and his original compositions are heard everywhere from NPR to "The Martha Stewart Show" to "Good Morning, America." His musical style combines folk, classical, and jazz elements. Smith CDs will be available to purchase at the event.

Ttickets are $65 for Clark County Historical Society members and $75 for non-members. Tables for eight are $520. Reservations are required by calling the CCHM at 360-993-5679.

CCHM Dinner Auction with Doug Smith

The Clark County HIstorical Museum (CCHM)'s Annual Dinner Auction will feature Grammy Award-winning acoustic guitarist Doug Smith at Club Green Meadows on Saturday, May 10. This month marks the CCHM's golden anniversary: the museum was first opened to the public 50 years ago, on May 24, 1964. The museum's annual fundraising event begins with a silent auction at 5 p.m., followed by a catered dinner and live auction. Ttickets are $65 for Clark County Historical Society members and $75 for non-members. Tables for eight are $520. Reservations are required by calling the CCHM at 360-993-5679. Proceeds from the evening will support the CCHM’s many contributions to the educational and cultural life of Vancouver and Clark County. 

 

 

Garden Walking Tour of Arnada Neighborhood

Vancouver's Arnada neighborhood is well-known locally for its beautiful old houses and its even more beautiful gardens. The Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) is hosting a Garden Walking Tour of the charming and history-rich Arnada neighborhood on Saturday, May 17. Participants will hear engaging stories about the history of notable Arnada homes whilst viewing their lovely contemporary gardens from the (non-muddy) sidewalk. Tour guides Brad Richardson and Barbara Clark will begin this one-time tour at 12 noon at the CCHM. Tickets are $5 for Clark County Historical Society members and $7 for non-members. Reservations are required by calling 360-993-5679.

Happy Birthday, CCHM!

On Saturday May, 24, the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) is celebrating its 50th brithday with free admission…and birthday cake! Come and see the CCHM's current fascinating exhibits, including "Shadows of Conflict: Clarke County and the Civil War," "Curiosities: Clark County Real and Imagined," "Woven History: Native American Basketry," and "Labor: A Working History." To help CCHM commemorate its first fifty years, the Clark College baking department is making an edible three-dimensional replica of the museum. The Museum Cake will be served at 1 p.m.

CCHM_CarnegiePassport_300X250_FinalLast but not least, CCHM is re-launching "Mr. Carnegie’s Grand Tour of Washington and Oregon Passport," an automobile-based touring adventure of Carnegie libraries in Washington and Oregon. It highlights all the Carnegie libraries in our region, the cultural legacy of 19th entury steel magnate Andrew Carnegie, who at one time was the richest man in the world. Believing that “the man who dies rich, dies disgraced,” Carnegie began giving away his fortune through endowments. He launched a library program that built 2,509 libraries around the world. Of the 43 built in Washington, 32 are still standing—one of which is the CCHM.

To learn more about the Clark County Historical Museum, visit www.cchmuseum.org or go to the museum's Facebook page. Happy Birthday, CCHM!

 

Art of Legacy at CCHM

It's a "double feature" at the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) on First Thursday, June 5, and First Friday, June 6. At 7 p.m. on June 5, the CCHM will present its newest exhibit, "Art of Legacy," paired with a presentation by the teachers and students who created the materials. Student artwork from the project will be on display through August at the CCHM, North Bank Artists Gallery, and Vancouver's City Hall. A panel discussion with teachers, students, and museum staff will take place on Thursday, and then on Friday, guests can view the artwork at the gallery and museum as part of First Friday Art Walk.

Art of Legacy is the result of a partnership between North Bank Gallery's executive director Maureen Andrade and CCHM’s former executive director Susan Tissot. Staff from the gallery and museum began working with veteran teacher Fae Moeller and her advanced art class from Thomas Jefferson Middle School on this multi-disciplinary art and humanities pilot project. In February, students spent an entire school day touring the museum and listening to lectures from museum staff. After the museum field trip, four teaching artists worked in the classroom with the students. They created art projects based on historic themes from their museum experience. Gallery and museum staff prepared students artwork for public display. Moeller worked with students on artist statements for each project. Visitors to the museum, gallery, and City Hall will see a variety of work and be able to read about the students’ experiences. To learn more, visit www.cchmuseum.org.
 

Garden Walking Tour, Redux

On May 17, the Clark County Historical Museum hosted a walking tour to highlight the many stunning gardens and historically significant houses in the Arnada neighborhood. The guide-led tour sold out in just a few weeks, and even the waiting list was maxed out—but our marvelous museum has stepped up to the potting bench (so to speak) and is hosting another tour on Saturday, May 31. The details are the same: participants will hear engaging stories about the history of notable Arnada homes whilst viewing their lovely contemporary gardens from the sidewalk. Tour guides Brad Richardson and Master Gardener Barbara Clark will begin Garden Walking Tour at 12 noon at the CCHM, 1511 Main St. in downtown Vancouver. Tickets are $5 for Clark County Historical Society members and $7 for non-members. Reservations are required by calling 360-993-5679. For more information, visit www.cchmuseum.org.
 

First Thursday at CCHM: Art of Legacy

It's a "double feature" at the Clark County Historical Museum (CCHM) on First Thursday, June 5, and First Friday, June 6. At 7 p.m. on June 5, the CCHM will present its newest exhibit, "Art of Legacy," paired with a presentation by the teachers and students who created the materials. Student artwork from the project will be on display through August at the CCHM, North Bank Artists Gallery, and Vancouver's City Hall. A panel discussion with teachers, students, and museum staff will take place on Thursday, and then on Friday, guests can view the artwork at the gallery and museum as part of First Friday Art Walk.

Art of Legacy is the result of a partnership between North Bank Gallery's executive director Maureen Andrade and CCHM’s former executive director Susan Tissot. Staff from the gallery and museum began working with veteran teacher Fae Moeller and her advanced art class from Thomas Jefferson Middle School on this multi-disciplinary art and humanities pilot project. In February, students spent an entire school day touring the museum and listening to lectures from museum staff. After the museum field trip, four teaching artists worked in the classroom with the students. They created art projects based on historic themes from their museum experience. Gallery and museum staff prepared students artwork for public display. Moeller worked with students on artist statements for each project. Visitors to the museum, gallery, and City Hall will see a variety of work and be able to read about the students’ experiences. To learn more, visit www.cchmuseum.org.