Clark College

Empty Bowls Project

It’s almost time for the second annual Empty Bowls Project. Those who attend the Thursday, Nov. 9, fundraiser at Woodland High School will receive a meal of soup and bread provided by local restaurants…as well as a hand-thrown ceramic bowl. The Empty Bowls Project is an international grassroots effort to raise both awareness and money in the fight to end hunger. It uses the act of creating bowls as both a symbolic visual of people in need and as a means to help fund local services.

The Woodland Action Center and Clark College have partnered on the project, supported by a grant from Arts of Clark County. The hand-thrown ceramic bowls to be given away at the fundraiser have been created by Clark College students. There will also be a silent auction of one-of-a-kind ceramic pieces from both professional and student artists. Proceeds will benefit the Woodland Action Center. The meal will be served by Woodland High School SkillsUSA students.

The meal begins at 6:30 p.m. and will be held at the Woodland High School Commons, 1500 Dike Access Rd. in Woodland. Tickets are $20 per person. To purchase tickets, go to woodlandaction.org or click on this link: http://www.woodlandaction.org/events/empty-bowls.

Woodland Action Center is both a food bank and community service center that was established more than 16 years ago. Its core program is distribution of food, personal hygiene, household items, and emergency supplies to low-income individuals and families. Woodland Action incorporates food bank best practices by offering nontraditional hours and a personal shopping experience intended to empower client choice and reduce waste. Through a partnership with Housing Opportunities of Southwest Washington, the center has also been able to offer emergency housing assistance. Its nonprofit thrift store was established in 2014 to support operational costs of the food bank and provide job skills training with the partnership of Goodwill and WorkSource.

Acclaimed Memoirist Kenny Fries kicks off Columbia Writers Series at Clark College

Since 1988, the Clark College Columbia Writers Series has brought local, national, and international authors to its Vancouver campus, showcasing writers such as Ursula Le Guin, Donald Justice, Sherman Alexie, Marvin Bell, William Stafford, Jamaica Kincaid, Roy Blount Jr., Gerald Stern, Carolyn Forchè, Diane Wakoski, Monica Drake and retired Clark faculty member Larry Weirather.

The 2017-2018 Columbia Writers Series kicks off with Kenny Fries, best known for his memoir “Body, Remember: A Memoir,” which recounts his experiences as a disabled child growing up in an abusive Orthodox Jewish home and slowly coming to terms with his identity as a gay, disabled man. He has written two other memoirs, “In the Province of the Gods” and “The History of My Shoes and the Evolution of Darwin’s Theory”—this last the winner of the Outstanding Book Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights. He is the editor of “Staring Back:  The Disability Experience from the Inside Out” and the author of the libretto for “The Memory Stone,” an opera commissioned by the Houston Grand Opera. His books of poems include “Anesthesia,” “Desert Walking,” and “In the Gardens of Japan.” He teaches in the MFA in Creative Writing at Goddard College.

Fries will speak from 11 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, Oct. 10, in room PUB 258A on Clark’s main campus at 1943 Vancouver Way. The event is free and open to the public. Directions and maps are available online. More Information about the Columbia Writers Series is available at www.clark.edu/cc/cws. Other speakers include:

  • Oct. 30: Aimee Bender, author of “The Girl in the Flammable Skirt” and “The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake”
  • Feb. 15, 2018: Cheston Knapp, editor of Tin House magazine and author of “Up Up, Down Down,” which will appear in Feb. 2018
  • May 14, 2018: Roger Reeves, Pushcart Prize-winning poet
  • May 17, 2018: Kate Berube, children’s book author and illustrator

Clark College Writers Series: Kenny Fries

Since 1988, the Clark College Columbia Writers Series has brought local, national, and international authors to its Vancouver campus, showcasing writers such as Ursula Le Guin, Donald Justice, Sherman Alexie, Marvin Bell, William Stafford, Jamaica Kincaid, Roy Blount Jr., Gerald Stern, Carolyn Forchè, Diane Wakoski, Monica Drake and retired Clark faculty member Larry Weirather.

The 2017-2018 Columbia Writers Series kicks off with Kenny Fries, best known for his memoir “Body, Remember: A Memoir,” which recounts his experiences as a disabled child growing up in an abusive Orthodox Jewish home and slowly coming to terms with his identity as a gay, disabled man. He has written two other memoirs, “In the Province of the Gods” and “The History of My Shoes and the Evolution of Darwin’s Theory”—this last the winner of the Outstanding Book Award from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights. He is the editor of “Staring Back:  The Disability Experience from the Inside Out” and the author of the libretto for “The Memory Stone,” an opera commissioned by the Houston Grand Opera. His books of poems include “Anesthesia,” “Desert Walking,” and “In the Gardens of Japan.” He teaches in the MFA in Creative Writing at Goddard College.

Fries will speak from 11 a.m. to noon on Tuesday, Oct. 10, in room PUB 258A on Clark’s main campus at 1943 Vancouver Way. The event is free and open to the public. Directions and maps are available online. More Information about the Columbia Writers Series is available at www.clark.edu/cc/cws. Other speakers include:

  • Oct. 30: Aimee Bender, author of “The Girl in the Flammable Skirt” and “The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake”
  • Feb. 15, 2018: Cheston Knapp, editor of Tin House magazine and author of “Up Up, Down Down,” which will appear in Feb. 2018
  • May 14, 2018: Roger Reeves, Pushcart Prize-winning poet
  • May 17, 2018: Kate Berube, children’s book author and illustrator

Lyric Sweets Spring Orchestral Concert

The award-winning Clark College Orchestra—under the direction of Donald Appert, Clark’s Music Department Chair— will present its spring concert at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, June 18, as part of the 2016-2017 season “Lyric Sweets.” The concert will be held in the Royal Durst Theatre, located on the campus of the Vancouver School of Arts & Academics, 3101 Main St. in the Shumway neighborhood of Vancouver. Featured on the program is pianist Gregory Partain performing Grieg’s Piano Concerto. The orchestra will also perform Beethoven’s Leonore Overture No. 3 and Suk’s Scherzo Fantastique.

Partain has toured Poland, Guatemala, and Costa Rica, and has performed as recitalist, chamber musician, or concerto soloist in most regions of the United States. Partain was the national winner of the 1986 KMS Competition in Seattle, leading to concert tours throughout the Pacific Northwest. In 1993, he won first prize in the Memphis Beethoven Club Competition, second prize in the International Bartok-Kabalevsky Competition in Radford, Virginia, and was a finalist in the Concert Artists Guild New York Competition. He has also been a finalist in the San Antonio International Piano Competition and the Beethoven Foundation Auditions in Indianapolis. In October 1999, Partain made his debut as a composer at the Kentucky Music Teachers Association (KMTA) state convention in Murray with the performance of his two songs for harp and soprano on poems of William Butler Yeats. Since then, he has taken over as KMTA Composition Chair. In the fall of 1997, Partain premiered a new concerto by colleague Larry Barnes with the Transylvania Orchestra under the direction of Ben Hawkins. While on sabbatical leave in 1999-2000, Partain prepared a series of three lecture recitals of the last five Beethoven Sonatas. He has since performed these programs in Boston, Columbus, Cincinnati, Louisville, at Ball State University, Centre College and at Transylvania University. Dr. Partain is also on the faculty of the Kentucky Governor’s Scholars Program.

The concert is open to the public and admission is free. Donations to the Orchestra General Fund will be accepted at the door. For complete information about all the Clark College Music Department concerts, including the orchestra, concert band, jazz ensemble, and choirs, visit http://www.clark.edu/campus-life/arts-events/music/music-concerts.

Folk Music Concert at Clark College

The Clark College Concert Choir and Concert Band perform a lively and eclectic assortment of folk music from around the world in their concert of “Folk Music” at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 17, in the O’Connell Sports Center on the Clark College Campus. The concert is free to the public.

The Concert Choir, under the direction of Dr. Jacob Funk, will perform stunning and moving folk arrangements from many different countries, including Norway, South Africa, the United States, Israel, Slovakia, and Great Britain. The choir has enjoyed learning the stories and traditions behind these timeless melodies and texts, and they are eager to share the beauty they have discovered. Ranging from the intimate to the bombastic, highlights include The Turtle Dove by Ralph Vaughan Williams, the Four Slovak Folk Songs by Béla Bartók, Soon-Ah Will Be Done by William Dawson, and the gorgeous James Erb arrangement of Shenandoah.

The College Concert Band, under the direction of Richard Inouye, will be performing Chester by William Schumann, based off the hymn song sung by the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Other selections by the band will be Percy Grainger’s Irish Tune from County Derry commonly known as Danny Boy, and the exciting Russian Sailor’s Dance transcribed from the Russian folksong Yablochko. The highlight of the band’s segment will be the traditional bullfighting song made famous by the great trumpet virtuoso Rafael Mendez, La Virgen de la Macarena, featuring four Clark College Band trumpet students.

For complete information about all the Clark College Music Department concerts including the orchestra, concert band, jazz ensemble, and choirs, visit http://www.clark.edu/campus-life/arts-events/music/music-concerts.

Lyric Sweets Spring Orchestra Concert

The award-winning Clark College Orchestra—under the direction of Donald Appert, Clark’s Music Department Chair— will present its spring concert at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, June 18, as part of the 2016-2017 season “Lyric Sweets.” The concert will be held in the Royal Durst Theatre, located on the campus of the Vancouver School of Arts & Academics, 3101 Main St. in the Shumway neighborhood of Vancouver. Featured on the program is pianist Gregory Partain performing Grieg’s Piano Concerto. The orchestra will also perform Beethoven’s Leonore Overture No. 3 and Suk’s Scherzo Fantastique.

Partain has toured Poland, Guatemala, and Costa Rica, and has performed as recitalist, chamber musician, or concerto soloist in most regions of the United States. Partain was the national winner of the 1986 KMS Competition in Seattle, leading to concert tours throughout the Pacific Northwest. In 1993, he won first prize in the Memphis Beethoven Club Competition, second prize in the International Bartok-Kabalevsky Competition in Radford, Virginia, and was a finalist in the Concert Artists Guild New York Competition. He has also been a finalist in the San Antonio International Piano Competition and the Beethoven Foundation Auditions in Indianapolis. In October 1999, Partain made his debut as a composer at the Kentucky Music Teachers Association (KMTA) state convention in Murray with the performance of his two songs for harp and soprano on poems of William Butler Yeats. Since then, he has taken over as KMTA Composition Chair. In the fall of 1997, Partain premiered a new concerto by colleague Larry Barnes with the Transylvania Orchestra under the direction of Ben Hawkins. While on sabbatical leave in 1999-2000, Partain prepared a series of three lecture recitals of the last five Beethoven Sonatas. He has since performed these programs in Boston, Columbus, Cincinnati, Louisville, at Ball State University, Centre College and at Transylvania University. Dr. Partain is also on the faculty of the Kentucky Governor’s Scholars Program.

The concert is open to the public and admission is free. Donations to the Orchestra General Fund will be accepted at the door. For complete information about all the Clark College Music Department concerts, including the orchestra, concert band, jazz ensemble, and choirs, visit http://www.clark.edu/campus-life/arts-events/music/music-concerts.

Folk Music Concert at Clark College

The Clark College Concert Choir and Concert Band perform a lively and eclectic assortment of folk music from around the world in their concert of “Folk Music” at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 17, in the O’Connell Sports Center on the Clark College Campus. The concert is free to the public.

The Concert Choir, under the direction of Dr. Jacob Funk, will perform stunning and moving folk arrangements from many different countries, including Norway, South Africa, the United States, Israel, Slovakia, and Great Britain. The choir has enjoyed learning the stories and traditions behind these timeless melodies and texts, and they are eager to share the beauty they have discovered. Ranging from the intimate to the bombastic, highlights include The Turtle Dove by Ralph Vaughan Williams, the Four Slovak Folk Songs by Béla Bartók, Soon-Ah Will Be Done by William Dawson, and the gorgeous James Erb arrangement of Shenandoah.

The College Concert Band, under the direction of Richard Inouye, will be performing Chester by William Schumann, based off the hymn song sung by the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Other selections by the band will be Percy Grainger’s Irish Tune from County Derry commonly known as Danny Boy, and the exciting Russian Sailor’s Dance transcribed from the Russian folksong Yablochko. The highlight of the band’s segment will be the traditional bullfighting song made famous by the great trumpet virtuoso Rafael Mendez, La Virgen de la Macarena, featuring four Clark College Band trumpet students.

For complete information about all the Clark College Music Department concerts including the orchestra, concert band, jazz ensemble, and choirs, visit http://www.clark.edu/campus-life/arts-events/music/music-concerts.

Big Band Bash at Clark College

The Clark College Jazz Ensemble hosts the 6th Annual Big Band Bash at 7 p.m. on Saturday, June 10, in the Gaiser Student Center on the Clark College campus at 1933 Fort Vancouver Way in Vancouver.  The concert is free to the public.

“We’re excited to have the Clackamas Community College Jazz Ensemble, directed by Lars Campbell, join us on stage this year,” says Richard Inouye, Clark’s Director of Bands. “And we’re also featuring the community group, VanPort Jazz. If you like the sounds of the Big Band era, you’ll love this concert.”

For complete information about all the Clark College Music Department concerts including the orchestra, concert band, jazz ensemble, and choirs, visit http://www.clark.edu/campus-life/arts-events/music/music-concerts.

Clark College offers an Associate in Music DTA/MRP degree with courses in music theory/ear training, instrumental and vocal performance training, and ensemble experience. Classes are designed to prepare the music major for advanced studies at a four-year institution while providing the non-major with the skills and background to fully enjoy music as a cultural pursuit. Ensembles on campus include three choral groups, orchestra, concert band, and jazz ensemble. Three tenured and several adjunct faculty, provide professional instruction to the 500+ students that pass through Beacock Music Hall each year.

Big Band Bash at Clark College

The Clark College Jazz Ensemble hosts the 6th Annual Big Band Bash at 7 p.m. on Saturday, June 10, in the Gaiser Student Center on the Clark College campus at 1933 Fort Vancouver Way in Vancouver.  The concert is free to the public.

“We’re excited to have the Clackamas Community College Jazz Ensemble, directed by Lars Campbell, join us on stage this year,” says Richard Inouye, Clark’s Director of Bands. “And we’re also featuring the community group, VanPort Jazz. If you like the sounds of the Big Band era, you’ll love this concert.”

For complete information about all the Clark College Music Department concerts including the orchestra, concert band, jazz ensemble, and choirs, visit http://www.clark.edu/campus-life/arts-events/music/music-concerts.

Clark College offers an Associate in Music DTA/MRP degree with courses in music theory/ear training, instrumental and vocal performance training, and ensemble experience. Classes are designed to prepare the music major for advanced studies at a four-year institution while providing the non-major with the skills and background to fully enjoy music as a cultural pursuit. Ensembles on campus include three choral groups, orchestra, concert band, and jazz ensemble. Three tenured and several adjunct faculty, provide professional instruction to the 500+ students that pass through Beacock Music Hall each year.

 

“Stop Kiss” at Clark College

Clark College Theatre concludes its 2016-2017 season with the poignant drama “Stop Kiss” by Diana Son. The play, directed by Ted Jonathan Gold, revolves around two women, Callie and Sara, whose first kiss prompts a violent attack that transforms their lives in a way they could never anticipate. The story is told out of chronological order, with scenes alternating between before and after the assault—creating a focus that’s less on the hate crime itself than on what it’s like to live and love in a society in which intolerance is an unspoken fact.

The cast includes Kennedy Marvin as Callie, Micah Lowery as Sara, Derek J. Sytsma as George, Stevie Riepe as Peter/Detective Cole, and Annika Davila as Mrs. Winsley/Nurse. Show dates are May 12, 13, 18, 19 and 20. All show times are at 7:30 p.m. in the Frost Arts Center’s Decker Theatre on Clark College’s main campus at 1933 Fort Vancouver Way. Tickets are $13 general admission, $9 for students and alumni, or $11 for seniors. Tickets may be purchased at the Clark College Bookstore in Gaiser Hall, online at http://www.clarkbookstore.com/site_theatre.asp, or by calling 360-992-2815.

Subtext Literary Festival at Clark College

The Clark College Columbia Writers Series is offering a full week of writers, readings, and events during its third annual Subtext Literary Festival. From May 15-18, the college will host well-known authors, as well as readings by Clark students and faculty. All Subtext events are free and open to the public. The festival will be held in the Penguin Union Building (PUB) on Clark College‘s main campus at 1933 Fort Vancouver Way; directions and maps are available online. Read on for a peek at the schedule:

  • May 15, “Possible Utopias” Writing Workshop with Arwen Spicer, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m., PUB 258B: Spicer, an instructor in Clark’s English department, will lead this workshop, which will provide an opportunity to engage in guided writing and discussion about imagining bright futures for our world. Each participant will leave the workshop with a final piece of writing that outlines their vision for a better society. The workshop is free and open to the public. Although participants are encouraged to come for the full two hours, drop-ins are also welcome.
  • May 16, Phoenix Unveiling, 2 to 4 p.m., PUB 161: Clark College’s national award-winning art and literary journal, Phoenix, will unveil its 2016-2017 edition with readings from student authors and free copies available for guests. The 2015-2016 edition of Phoenix just earned the prize for Best Design from the Association of Writers & Writing Programs—the first time the award has gone to a two-year college in a decade.
  • May 17, “Clark Crossings” Student and Faculty Reading, noon to 1 p.m., PUB 258A: students and faculty will read from their own work or from the work of their favorite writers. Each reading will relate to the theme of “Transformation,” and fiction, poetry, and memoir will all be included.
  • May 18, fiction writer Peter Rock, noon to 1 p.m., PUB 161: Rock is a professor of creative writing at Reed College. His most recent book is Spells, a novel-within-photographs that’s a collaboration with five photographers and concerns shadows and bodies, the living and the dead, talking animals, and all manner of shape-shifting. He is also the author of the novels Klickitat, The Shelter Cycle, My Abandonment, The Bewildered, The Ambidextrist, Carnival Wolves, and This Is the Place, as well as a story collection, The Unsettling.

The Columbia Writers Series was launched at Clark College in 1988, bringing local, national and international authors to the college and the region. Information about the Columbia Writers Series is available at www.clark.edu/cc/cws.

Clark College Student Art Exhibit

Clark College invites the community to join them in celebrating art created by Clark College students on Tuesday, May 16, during its Art Student Annual Exhibit. The event will begin at 2.p.m. with the unveiling of the 2017 Phoenix in the Penguin Union Building (PUB) room 161. Phoenix is Clark College’s student-run, award-winning art and literary journal, and a collaborative project between the English and Art Departments. Students may submit original creative works such as fiction, poetry, video, music, and visual art.

The unveiling will be followed by the Art Student Annual Exhibit from 4 to 6 p.m. in the Archer Gallery. Submissions include paintings, drawings, photography, ceramics, metal arts, computer graphics, videos, and other creative works. All events are free and open to the public. For more information about Phoenix, visit www.clarkphoenix.com. For more information about Archer Gallery, visit www.clark.edu/archergallery. Clark College is located at 1933 Fort Vancouver Way in Vancouver. Driving directions and parking maps are available at www.clark.edu/maps.

“Stop Kiss” at Clark College

Clark College Theatre concludes its 2016-2017 season with the poignant drama “Stop Kiss” by Diana Son. The play, directed by Ted Jonathan Gold, revolves around two women, Callie and Sara, whose first kiss prompts a violent attack that transforms their lives in a way they could never anticipate. The story is told out of chronological order, with scenes alternating between before and after the assault—creating a focus that’s less on the hate crime itself than on what it’s like to live and love in a society in which intolerance is an unspoken fact.

The cast includes Kennedy Marvin as Callie, Micah Lowery as Sara, Derek J. Sytsma as George, Stevie Riepe as Peter/Detective Cole, and Annika Davila as Mrs. Winsley/Nurse. Show dates are May 12, 13, 18, 19 and 20. All show times are at 7:30 p.m. in the Frost Arts Center’s Decker Theatre on Clark College’s main campus at 1933 Fort Vancouver Way. Tickets are $13 general admission, $9 for students and alumni, or $11 for seniors. Tickets may be purchased at the Clark College Bookstore in Gaiser Hall, online at http://www.clarkbookstore.com/site_theatre.asp, or by calling 360-992-2815.

Subtext Literary Festival

The Clark College Columbia Writers Series is offering a full week of writers, readings, and events during its third annual Subtext Literary Festival. From May 15-18, the college will host well-known authors, as well as readings by Clark students and faculty. All Subtext events are free and open to the public. The festival will be held in the Penguin Union Building (PUB) on Clark College‘s main campus at 1933 Fort Vancouver Way; directions and maps are available online. Read on for a peek at the schedule:

  • May 15, “Possible Utopias” Writing Workshop with Arwen Spicer, 12:30 to 2:30 p.m., PUB 258B: Spicer, an instructor in Clark’s English department, will lead this workshop, which will provide an opportunity to engage in guided writing and discussion about imagining bright futures for our world. Each participant will leave the workshop with a final piece of writing that outlines their vision for a better society. The workshop is free and open to the public. Although participants are encouraged to come for the full two hours, drop-ins are also welcome.
  • May 16, Phoenix Unveiling, 2 to 4 p.m., PUB 161: Clark College’s national award-winning art and literary journal, Phoenix, will unveil its 2016-2017 edition with readings from student authors and free copies available for guests. The 2015-2016 edition of Phoenix just earned the prize for Best Design from the Association of Writers & Writing Programs—the first time the award has gone to a two-year college in a decade.
  • May 17, “Clark Crossings” Student and Faculty Reading, noon to 1 p.m., PUB 258A: students and faculty will read from their own work or from the work of their favorite writers. Each reading will relate to the theme of “Transformation,” and fiction, poetry, and memoir will all be included.
  • May 18, fiction writer Peter Rock, noon to 1 p.m., PUB 161: Rock is a professor of creative writing at Reed College. His most recent book is Spells, a novel-within-photographs that’s a collaboration with five photographers and concerns shadows and bodies, the living and the dead, talking animals, and all manner of shape-shifting. He is also the author of the novels Klickitat, The Shelter Cycle, My Abandonment, The Bewildered, The Ambidextrist, Carnival Wolves, and This Is the Place, as well as a story collection, The Unsettling.

The Columbia Writers Series was launched at Clark College in 1988, bringing local, national and international authors to the college and the region. Information about the Columbia Writers Series is available at www.clark.edu/cc/cws.

“Stop Kiss” at Clark College

Clark College Theatre concludes its 2016-2017 season with the poignant drama “Stop Kiss” by Diana Son. The play, directed by Ted Jonathan Gold, revolves around two women, Callie and Sara, whose first kiss prompts a violent attack that transforms their lives in a way they could never anticipate. The story is told out of chronological order, with scenes alternating between before and after the assault—creating a focus that’s less on the hate crime itself than on what it’s like to live and love in a society in which intolerance is an unspoken fact.

The cast includes Kennedy Marvin as Callie, Micah Lowery as Sara, Derek J. Sytsma as George, Stevie Riepe as Peter/Detective Cole, and Annika Davila as Mrs. Winsley/Nurse. Show dates are May 12, 13, 18, 19 and 20. All show times are at 7:30 p.m. in the Frost Arts Center’s Decker Theatre on Clark College’s main campus at 1933 Fort Vancouver Way. Tickets are $13 general admission, $9 for students and alumni, or $11 for seniors. Tickets may be purchased at the Clark College Bookstore in Gaiser Hall, online at http://www.clarkbookstore.com/site_theatre.asp, or by calling 360-992-2815.

NYT Bestselling Author Ruth Wariner at Clark College Writers’ Series

Since 1988, the Clark College Columbia Writers Series has brought local, national, and international authors to its Vancouver campus, showcasing writers such as Ursula Le Guin, Donald Justice, Sherman Alexie, Marvin Bell, William Stafford, Jamaica Kincaid, Roy Blount Jr., Gerald Stern, Carolyn Forchè, Diane Wakoski, Monica Drake and retired Clark faculty member Larry Weirather.

“The Columbia Writers Series is designed to bring writers—whether they are fiction or nonfiction writers, poets, playwrights, or screenwriters–to the college,” says Clark College English professor Jim Finley, who co-directs the writers series with English professor Alexis Nelson. “We not only bring diverse voices to campus, but we recognize the work of Clark’s own faculty authors as well.”

The next writer to be featured is Ruth Wariner, New York Times bestselling author of the memoir The Sound of Gravel, which has gained national praise for its frank, spare description of her childhood growing up in a polygamist Mormon colony in Mexico. (Learn more about Wariner’s story by visiting her website at www.ruthwariner.com.) Wariner will read from and discuss her writing from 11 a.m. to noon on Wednesday, May 3, in room PUB 258A on Clark’s main campus at 1943 Vancouver Way. The event is free and open to the public. Directions and maps are available online.

Photo credit: Joni Shimabukuro

Growing Our Future: 2017 Food Summit

Clark College is hosting a day-long event all about food! “Growing Our Future: 2017 Food Summit,” will help Clark College gather information about a potential ecology and agronomy program, and how its STEM and professional and technical education programs can provide the training needed for a vibrant local food ecosystem. With support from the Clark County Food System Council, the summit has been designed to include a variety of learning opportunities, from the science of food to production and nutrition.

The Food Summit includes special guest speakers, morning and afternoon workshops, lunch with a product showcase and time for networking, and a “Talking and Tasting Café” where attendees can sample local beer, wine, coffee and tea as they discuss issues and actions gleaned from break-out sessions. Topics include food hubs and cooperative sourcing, farming with sustainability, fermented foods and the microbiome, local food supply chains, and many, many more. Local chefs and restaurateurs will be in attendance and featured on discussion panels and available for in-depth discussions about the future of our local food system.

Click here to register. The Food Summit will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 10, at Clark College Columbia Tech Center, 18700 S.E. Mill Plain Blvd. in East Vancouver. Free parking is available on site.

Growing Our Future: 2017 Food Summit

Clark College is hosting a day-long event all about food! “Growing Our Future: 2017 Food Summit,” will help Clark College gather information about a potential ecology and agronomy program, and how its STEM and professional and technical education programs can provide the training needed for a vibrant local food ecosystem. With support from the Clark County Food System Council, the summit has been designed to include a variety of learning opportunities, from the science of food to production and nutrition.

The Food Summit includes special guest speakers, morning and afternoon workshops, lunch with a product showcase and time for networking, and a “Talking and Tasting Café” where attendees can sample local beer, wine, coffee and tea as they discuss issues and actions gleaned from break-out sessions. Topics include food hubs and cooperative sourcing, farming with sustainability, fermented foods and the microbiome, local food supply chains, and many, many more. Local chefs and restaurateurs will be in attendance and featured on discussion panels and available for in-depth discussions about the future of our local food system.

Click here to register. The Food Summit will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 10, at Clark College Columbia Tech Center, 18700 S.E. Mill Plain Blvd. in East Vancouver. Free parking is available on site.

Art by Clark College Students at Boomerang

Boomerang will host a special exhibit by Clark College art students, “Tell Me a Story,” during the month of February. The exhibit is in cooperation with Clark College art professor Grant Hottle and members of the Clark College Art Club, including full time artist and past president Matthew L. Tycer, plus Martin Stone, Andy Bao, Claudia Carter and Kelly Pearce. Beginning with an opening reception on First Friday, Feb. 3, the upper and lower level galleries will display works from Clark College student artists using various media.

The exhibit is in line withe the Clark College Art Club mission: to provide opportunities outside the classroom to pursue the study of art and art history. The club ensures safe studio spaces after hours, visits to galleries and museums, and student engagement. Art Club provides a forum for discussions about art and creativity.

Drop by Boomerang any time from 5 to 9 p.m. on First Friday for live music, complimentary light refreshments, and a chance to meet the artists. The exhibit continues through Feb. 28. While you’re there, you’ll want to enjoy some treats from the coffee shop and browse through Boomerang’s huge collection of home décor items, jewelry, books and more, while your kids hang out in the indoor treehouse. Proceeds from the sale of all items go directly to local charities and nonprofit organizations. To learn more, visit www.boomerangvancouver.com.

Above image: detail from a mixed media piece by ML Tycer, “Kenny Loggins (Danger Zone)”

Robert Burns Scottish Supper

“Go bring to me a pint o wine / And fill it in a silver tassie / That I may drink, before I go / A service to my bonnie lassie.” So said the beloved Scottish poet Robert Burns in his late 1700s poem “The Silver Tassie.” And now you can have your pint of wine—or glass, as the case may be on this more civilized occasion—at the Robert Burns Supper, a fundraising event that’s a partnership between the Wine and Food Society of Clark County and Clark College. This tasty event is a fundraiser for Clark College Foundation‘s Scholarship in Viticulture and Culinary Arts and the Wine and Food Society’s scholarship fund.

In Scotland, January is the season for a slew of Burns Nights honoring Burns with traditional Scottish food and drink, lively music, and good cheer—but on Saturday, Jan. 28, you will only have to travel as far as the Clark College campus at Columbia Tech Center to get a taste of Scottish culture. Guests will enjoy an authentic Scottish supper including a haggis (a savory pudding containing sheep heart, liver, and lungs minced with onion, oatmeal, suet, spices, and salt, mixed with stock, and simmered for hours in the sheep’s stomach lining, in case you didn’t know—although perhaps you didn’t want to know) that will be ceremonially marched into the venue with a bagpipe procession by the Fort Vancouver Pipe Band. Ticket prices include a welcome cocktail, the full dinner, complimentary beer and wine, and a Scotch toast (we don’t know what that is, but we bet it’s good fun). Entertainment will include recitations of Burns’ poetry, live and silent auctions, and a Dessert Dash.

The event will begin with a 5 p.m. social hour at the no-host bar, and the program will start at 6 p.m. Clark College at Columbia Tech Center is located at 18700 S.E. Mill Plain Blvd. in East Vancouver. Individual tickets are $75 and tables for eight are $550. A portion of the ticket price is tax-deductible. To reserve a seat or table, visit wfscc.org/robert-burns-supper or call 360-991-7333.