Bats

Owls & Bats at the Water Center

Clark County’s Green Neighbors Program is celebrating its fifth anniversary from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 15, at the Water Resources Education Center, 4600 S.E. Columbia Way. Admission is free and light refreshments will be provided.

The featured speaker is John Prucich, a wildlife biologist, conservationist and licensed falconer known as The Falconer. He will explain the difference between nocturnal and diurnal animals and bring in live owls and other animals that hunt in the night. He will discuss their diets, ability to fly with barely a sound, and conservation efforts that can help ensure these animals have a future. Guests will learn what owls eat by comparing the bones, skulls and teeth found in owl pellets to charts and pictures. They will discover the less scary side of bats—heroes of the night that eat insects, spread seeds and pollinate plants.

Clark County’s Green Neighbors program helps citizens create a sustainable lifestyle. The program promotes green living through a variety of community events such as the Natural Garden Tour, Wastebusters, and the Recycled Arts Festival. To stay up to date on green tips and local events, sign up for the Green Neighbors newsletter at http://clarkgreenneighbors.org/newsletter-signup/modify.

Owls & Bats at the Water Center

Clark County’s Green Neighbors Program is celebrating its fifth anniversary from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 15, at the Water Resources Education Center, 4600 S.E. Columbia Way. Admission is free and light refreshments will be provided.

The featured speaker is John Prucich, a wildlife biologist, conservationist and licensed falconer known as The Falconer. He will explain the difference between nocturnal and diurnal animals and bring in live owls and other animals that hunt in the night. He will discuss their diets, ability to fly with barely a sound, and conservation efforts that can help ensure these animals have a future. Guests will learn what owls eat by comparing the bones, skulls and teeth found in owl pellets to charts and pictures. They will discover the less scary side of bats—heroes of the night that eat insects, spread seeds and pollinate plants.

Clark County’s Green Neighbors program helps citizens create a sustainable lifestyle. The program promotes green living through a variety of community events such as the Natural Garden Tour, Wastebusters, and the Recycled Arts Festival. To stay up to date on green tips and local events, sign up for the Green Neighbors newsletter at http://clarkgreenneighbors.org/newsletter-signup/modify.

Free Bat Presentation at Vintage Books

Fifteen species of bats call Washington home—how much do you know about these beneficial flying mammals? Vintage Books is hosting a talk with local bat expert Sally Fisher at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 24. Come with all your bat-related questions and get information on how you can help support local bat populations.

Vintage Books, Southwest Washington’s largest independent bookstore, is located at 6613 E. Mill Plain in Vancouver. Visit www.vintage-books.net for more information, or check out their Facebook page for pithy updates on new literary arrivals as well as the store’s many events, book signings, and author appearances.

Bats at Vintage Books!

Fifteen species of bats call Washington home—how much do you know about these beneficial flying mammals? Vintage Books is hosting a talk with local bat expert Sally Fisher at 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 24. Come with all your bat-related questions and get information on how you can help support local bat populations.

Vintage Books, Southwest Washington’s largest independent bookstore, is located at 6613 E. Mill Plain in Vancouver. Visit www.vintage-books.net for more information, or check out their Facebook page for pithy updates on new literary arrivals as well as the store’s many events, book signings, and author appearances.

Science on Tap: Spiders and Bats

They’re heebie-jeebie-inducing, but endlessly fascinating: spiders and bats! And now you can find out more than you probably ever wanted to know about both these creepy-crawly, winged-and-squeakie subjects at the Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap—a science lecture series where you can sit back, enjoy a pint, and laugh while you learn. You don’t have to be a science geek to love this stuff, and you don’t even have to love beer, because the Kiggins also has wine and soft drinks available for non-craft-brew lovers. Plus, there’s also pizza, theater-style popcorn, and snacks. Tickets for Science on Tap are $8 in advance or $10 at the door. The Kiggins is located at 1011 Main St. in downtown Vancouver. Online tickets are available by clicking here. “Out of the Dark: Spiders and Bats” will begin at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 8, but the Kiggins doors will open at 6 p.m. in order for you to buy a pint or two, chat with your friends, and get settled in the main theater’s cushy seats.

Science on Tap: Spiders & Bats

They’re heebie-jeebie-inducing, but endlessly fascinating: spiders and bats! And now you can find out more than you probably ever wanted to know about both these creepy-crawly, winged-and-squeakie subjects at the Kiggins Theater‘s next Science on Tap—a science lecture series where you can sit back, enjoy a pint, and laugh while you learn. You don’t have to be a science geek to love this stuff, and you don’t even have to love beer, because the Kiggins also has wine and soft drinks available for non-craft-brew lovers. Plus, there’s also pizza, theater-style popcorn, and snacks.

“Out of the Dark: Spiders and Bats” will begin at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 8, but the Kiggins doors will open at 6 p.m. in order for you to buy a pint or two, chat with your friends, and get settled in the main theater’s cushy seats. This month’s Science on Tap features two speakers: Dr. Susan Masta, associate professor at Portland State University‘s biology department, will present “Arachnophilia: Fun Facts About Spiders and Their Kin.” Masta will explore myths and fears about spiders and answer questions on the biology of common Pacific Northwest arachnids in the Pacific Northwest. Next, you’ll hear from Dr. Christine Portfors, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences at Washington State University in Vancouver. In her presentation, “Debunking Bats’ Bad Rap,” Portfors will discuss and answer questions on the biology and neuroscience of bats and will help dispel some of commonly held bat-myths.

Tickets for Science on Tap are $8 in advance or $10 at the door. The Kiggins is located at 1011 Main St. in downtown Vancouver. Online tickets are available by clicking here.