Arts of Clark County

Fifth Annual Clark County Open Studios Tour

The fifth annual Clark County Open Studios Tour showcases the beautiful and distinctive works of 53 local artists whose studios can be visited on the countywide tour on Nov. 11-12. You can also see works by these artists at at Vancouver’s newest contemporary art space, the CAVE (Contemporary Arts Vancouver Experiment) at 108 E. Evergreen Blvd. in downtown Vancouver. The exhibit will be up through the month of November.

The tour itself takes place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 11-12. Fifty different artist studios across Clark County will be participating. As an ongoing program of Arts of Clark County, this free, self-guided tour now occupies a regular spot on the fall arts calendar for art lovers and collectors. The event has showcased more than 130 different artists to date. The event is a once-a-year opportunity to meet local artists in their native habitat, sharing how, why and where art is created. On Open Studios weekend, visitors can learn first-hand about techniques in painting, printmaking, sculpture, glass, ceramic, jewelry, fiber arts, and photography.

As demographics shift and as new residents move to Clark County, the mix of artists in Open Studios shifts as well. This year, 36% of participants—or 19 artists on the tour—are entirely new to the event. Digital printmaker Noah Matteucci, artist Megan Eckman, and photographer Jeffrey Opp, for example, are all relative newcomers to Clark County and they are also newcomers in this year’s Open Studios tour, adding to the mix of media and styles represented.

Free printed guidebooks are available at the CAVE. You can also view or print your own guide, access a custom Google map showing studio locations and suggested routes, learn more about each artist, and get a list of locations where you can pick up a printed guide—all from the event website at www.ccopenstudios.org.

Open Studios Tour

The fifth annual Clark County Open Studios Tour showcases the beautiful and distinctive works of 53 local artists whose studios can be visited on the countywide tour on Nov. 11-12. You can also see works by these artists at at Vancouver’s newest contemporary art space, the CAVE (Contemporary Arts Vancouver Experiment) at 108 E. Evergreen Blvd. in downtown Vancouver. The exhibit will be up through the month of November.

The tour itself takes place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 11-12. Fifty different artist studios across Clark County will be participating. As an ongoing program of Arts of Clark County, this free, self-guided tour now occupies a regular spot on the fall arts calendar for art lovers and collectors. The event has showcased more than 130 different artists to date. The event is a once-a-year opportunity to meet local artists in their native habitat, sharing how, why and where art is created. On Open Studios weekend, visitors can learn first-hand about techniques in painting, printmaking, sculpture, glass, ceramic, jewelry, fiber arts, and photography.

As demographics shift and as new residents move to Clark County, the mix of artists in Open Studios shifts as well. This year, 36% of participants—or 19 artists on the tour—are entirely new to the event. Digital printmaker Noah Matteucci, artist Megan Eckman, and photographer Jeffrey Opp, for example, are all relative newcomers to Clark County and they are also newcomers in this year’s Open Studios tour, adding to the mix of media and styles represented.

Free printed guidebooks are available at the CAVE. You can also view or print your own guide, access a custom Google map showing studio locations and suggested routes, learn more about each artist, and get a list of locations where you can pick up a printed guide—all from the event website at www.ccopenstudios.org.

Above image: detail from original painting by Camas artist Liz Pike. See more of her work by clicking here or visiting her website at http://lizpike.art/ART/Welcome.html.

Empty Bowls Project

It’s almost time for the second annual Empty Bowls Project. Those who attend the Thursday, Nov. 9, fundraiser at Woodland High School will receive a meal of soup and bread provided by local restaurants…as well as a hand-thrown ceramic bowl. The Empty Bowls Project is an international grassroots effort to raise both awareness and money in the fight to end hunger. It uses the act of creating bowls as both a symbolic visual of people in need and as a means to help fund local services.

The Woodland Action Center and Clark College have partnered on the project, supported by a grant from Arts of Clark County. The hand-thrown ceramic bowls to be given away at the fundraiser have been created by Clark College students. There will also be a silent auction of one-of-a-kind ceramic pieces from both professional and student artists. Proceeds will benefit the Woodland Action Center. The meal will be served by Woodland High School SkillsUSA students.

The meal begins at 6:30 p.m. and will be held at the Woodland High School Commons, 1500 Dike Access Rd. in Woodland. Tickets are $20 per person. To purchase tickets, go to woodlandaction.org or click on this link: http://www.woodlandaction.org/events/empty-bowls.

Woodland Action Center is both a food bank and community service center that was established more than 16 years ago. Its core program is distribution of food, personal hygiene, household items, and emergency supplies to low-income individuals and families. Woodland Action incorporates food bank best practices by offering nontraditional hours and a personal shopping experience intended to empower client choice and reduce waste. Through a partnership with Housing Opportunities of Southwest Washington, the center has also been able to offer emergency housing assistance. Its nonprofit thrift store was established in 2014 to support operational costs of the food bank and provide job skills training with the partnership of Goodwill and WorkSource.

Arts & Culture Summit

Do you have something to say about the arts in Clark County? Or maybe you’re an artists, and you’d like to know exactly what Clark County is doing to help the arts and artists thrive on the North Bank. Or maybe you’re just curious! No matter what your arts-related question is, you can likely have it answered (and then some) at the second Arts & Culture Summit 2: Creating Space for the Arts, an all-day event featuring panel discussions and workshops focused on creating much-needed venues and spaces for arts and culture activities.

The focus of morning panels and afternoon workshops will be on generating the ideas and momentum to create dedicated spaces for the arts: studios, galleries, performing arts venues, classrooms, and more. Particular attention will be given to buildings and infrastructure because of the number of development projects imminent or underway which may include arts and culture components. Afternoon workshops will invite local stakeholders and community members to put their heads together to create real action plans.

The summit—8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 23—will be held at the Artillery Barracks
, located at 
600 E. Hathaway Road 
on the Vancouver National Historic Reserve. The cost is $35 per person. The summit agenda, a complete list of speakers and panelists, and registration information can be found at the Arts of Clark County website at artsofclarkcounty.org.

Open Studios Tour

Fifty artists across Clark County are busily getting ready for the fourth annual Open Studios Tour from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Nov. 12 & 13—a free, self-guided tour where local artists open up their studios and allow you to see where and how they make their art. You’ll find artists working in studios that range from repurposed barns and cottages to custom-designed urban spaces. You’ll meet the artists, learn about their inspiration and their process, and be able to buy paintings, jewelry, sculpture, glass work, metalwork, garden art, recycled art, fiber art, ceramics, photography and more directly from the people who made it.

If you go to the Open Studios Tour website you can get a driving map of the studios and plan your weekend. This is a free, juried, self-guided tour of some of Southwest Washington’s finest artists, and you won’t need to bother with any stuffy galleries: you’ll be right in the thick of it, watching the artists a work and talking to them about their inspiration and their creative process. It’s not necessary to purchase any art, but it will be hard not to after seeing what goes into making it and learning each artist’s story.

You can learn more about all the artists at www.ccopenstudios.org. Be prepared: both the First Friday reception and the tour itself is a well-attended event. Art lovers come from Portland, Salem, Longview, Tacoma, Seattle, and the coast specifically to meet our Clark County artists. This annual tour is jointly sponsored by Arts of Clark County and the Clark County Arts Commission.

Poetry Moves in the Park

Poetry moves us in mysterious ways…and the poems on C-TRAN buses literally move around Clark County, while uplifting, inspiring and provoking travelers to think deeply. The poems are a result of the innovative Poetry Moves program, a joint project among C-TRAN, the Arts of Clark County, Printed Matter Vancouver and Clark County Poet Laureate Christopher Luna. Here’s the story:

In 2013, Luna launched a program that sends local writers into Clark County schools to lead poetry workshops aimed at showing children that poetry can be meaningful, magical, and fun. The program received grant support from Humanities Washington and the Arts of Clark County, which approached C-TRAN about putting poems on its buses. The first poems appeared on 166 C-TRAN buses from January through June of this year; now ten more poems have been selected and will appear on C-TRAN buses from now until December 2016.

You can hear these budding young poets—ranging in age from third through 12th grades—read their own poems on stage in Esther Short Park from 10 a.m. to noon on Sunday, July 3. A C-TRAN bus will be present so that the students and audience members can see what the poems look like installed on the buses. For more information, email printedmattervancouver@gmail.com.

Poetry Moves

Poetry moves us in mysterious ways…and the poems on C-TRAN buses literally move around Clark County, while uplifting, inspiring and provoking travelers to think deeply. The poems are a result of the innovative Poetry Moves program, a joint project among C-TRAN, the Arts of Clark County, Printed Matter Vancouver and Clark County Poet Laureate Christopher Luna. Here’s the story:

In 2013, Luna launched a program that sends local writers into Clark County schools to lead poetry workshops aimed at showing children that poetry can be meaningful, magical, and fun. The program received grant support from Humanities Washington and the Arts of Clark County, which approached C-TRAN about putting poems on its buses. The first poems appeared on 166 C-TRAN buses from January through June of this year; now ten more poems have been selected and will appear on C-TRAN buses from now until December 2016.

You can hear these budding young poets—ranging in age from third through 12th grades—read their own poems on stage in Esther Short Park from 10 a.m. to noon on Sunday, July 3. A C-TRAN bus will be present so that the students and audience members can see what the poems look like installed on the buses. For more information, email printedmattervancouver@gmail.com.