Battle Ground

Waxing on about bees

Jacqueline Freeman is making a buzz in the field that chose her – beekeeping.

Originally from small towns in New England, Jacqueline and her husband Joseph Freeman moved to Seattle years ago and tried to be city dwellers. Soon, they discovered they just weren’t urbanites and in 2002 found 10 acres in tiny Venersborg in Clark County. While they didn’t intend to farm, today they have acres of gardens, pasture and forest, home to cows, hens, a goat, three cats, a dog and a few hundred thousand honey bees.

Jacqueline’s relationship with bees began when she was offered a hive from a couple that was moving from their house in Portland.

“I was fascinated from day one,” she said. “I was transfixed. I spent all this time with the bees. It wasn’t just a box of bugs.”

Over the years, Jacqueline learned about organic gardening, permaculture, and what really resonated was biodynamics, essentially a spiritual approach to organic gardening. She became a certified beekeeper and joined the Clark County Beekeepers Association. She quickly noticed most methods for contemporary beekeeping involved the use of chemicals and medicines to keep the bees alive and productive. But the more she listened to the bees, the more she knew she couldn’t take this approach. Her fellow beekeepers told her she would lose whole hives – and she did – but today she has ten working hives and a wealth of knowledge to keep them thriving. And the tides are changing – today, four out of the five officers at the bee club are fully organic.

After years of talking and listening to her bees, Jacqueline started writing down what she was learning through experience – and what the bees themselves were saying to her in her meditative sessions by their hives. Eventually, she had a book on organic beekeeping fleshed out. With the help of Susan Chernak McElroy (New York Times bestselling author of “Animals as Teachers & Healers”), she completed “The Song of Increase: Returning to our Sacred Partnership with Honeybees.”

The self-published tome was quickly picked up by Sounds True Publishing and will soon be translated into languages around the world. Jacqueline accepts invitations from across the country and Europe to talk about bees and meet with beekeepers.

Back at the farm, she offers classes of all kinds, and Joseph teaches a physical therapy technique he developed for horses. But the bees have become a central and sacred part of their journey.

Jacqueline Freeman
Friendly Haven Rise Farm
20309 N.E. 242nd Ave., Battle Ground
360-687-8384

 

 

A lake to be liked

Don’t pass up this local gem for hiking, swimming and year round camping

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photos by todd gunderson

Battle Ground Lake State Park feels a world way, especially in the winter, with the fog settled on the water, dew in the grass and only the hushed sounds of anglers on the docks. Only 20 minutes from Vancouver, right outside Old Town Battle Ground, this 280-acre park collects a day-use fee of $10, and is really worth it, especially for large and small family gatherings, day hikes and horseback riding, not to mention the lake itself.

One could easily spend the day down at the picturesque lake, which is of volcanic origin and considered to be a smaller version of Oregon’s Crater Lake, according to information provided by Washington State Parks. The spring-fed lake is stocked with trout, and when we were there, a pair of fishermen were practicing fly fishing on the banks.

For hikers and families, the trail around the lake is rustic and wet and full of creatures and mushrooms to identify. It’s an infinite adventure for small feet and fingers. The trail follows or dips down right to the water in many places, and my kids were so enthralled with the riparian area that I had to drag them out of there even though it was only 50 degrees and we were all freezing.

Battle Ground Lake State Park is a year-round campground with ample facilities, but the jewel of the off-season are the four lake-facing cabins among a grove of Douglas fir trees. Each cabin is 12-by-24 feet in size and accommodates up to five people. My only complaint is that it is nearly impossible to find out how much a cabin rents for, and you have to create an online identity at washington.goingtocamp.com

before you can learn fees or reserve cabins. Since fees change from year to year and season to season, I recommend calling 888-CAMPOUT to learn more and reserve. This park has 25 standard campsites, six hookup sites and 15 primitive sites that require campers to hike a quarter- to a half-mile from the parking lot, along with group accommodations and horse camping. The primitive sites are $12 and prices go up to almost $40.

Battle Ground Lake State Park is less popular than other local parks because of the fees, but it is truly a gem, and worth a visit or a stay.